Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Scale Up

Spirulina greenhouses at France’s Groupe Olivier

September 25, 2018
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Spirulina is grown in heated basins in greenhouses at Groupe Olivier, in the Nantes region of France.

Cécile Barbière writes for Euractive.fr (translated by Rob Kirby) that, in large greenhouses formerly home to the tomatoes and cucumbers of the market gardening Groupe Olivier, the family-owned business has over the past three years ventured into growing spirulina.

Under the leadership of Stéphane Olivier, a PhD in biochemistry, Groupe Olivier embarked on the adventure at their 12-generation old farming site on the outskirts of Nantes, in Western France. Following ten years’ experience in the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industry, the 40-year-old joined the ranks of the family business, in charge of the group’s microalgae branch.

“The idea of growing spirulina came from the desire to restore the old greenhouse which was no longer being used for market gardening,” explained Dr. Olivier.

The first tests started three years ago. With the support of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (which he says was “between €1-2 million,”) Dr. Olivier restored a greenhouse where currently spirulina is growing over an area of 2,800 m2. “This gives us a production capacity equivalent to four tons of dry spirulina a year, which would make us the second-largest producer in France,” he said.

At the intersection of aquaculture and market gardening, growing spirulina in France remains largely artisanal, while the market is taking off. In 2014 the French production of spirulina reached approximately 20 tons, whereas consumption was at around 200 tons, according to Dr. Oliver.

Currently spirulina’s supply chain is not subject to any certification process. This is a problem which led to the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (Anses) to raise the alarm on the quality of imported spirulina. “Our challenge today is to develop European production with higher quality,” said Dr. Olivier.

In Groupe Olivier’s first year of production, the harvest amounted to 700kg, all of which was sold to a single customer. For the second harvest, Dr. Olivier is anticipating three tons. “We have expanded into fresh and frozen spirulina. These are the forms which further preserve spirulina’s qualities.”

While spirulina is currently a dietary supplement in many parts of the world, it is in the form of a condiment that Groupe Olivier now wishes to develop the market. “We are working with regional food producers to develop products based on spirulina,” he said, “such as in Pornic in western France, where the ice cream parlor La Fraiserie is offering a lime and spirulina sorbet.”

Read More

More Like This…

Copyright ©2010-2020 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
How did plants make the evolutionary jump from water to land? Scientists think that green algae are their water-living ancestors, but we are not sure how the transition t...
Laura Sanders reports in Sciencenews.org that using algae as local oxygen factories in the brain might one day lead to therapies for strokes or other damage from too litt...
Dartmouth scientists have created a more sustainable feed for aquaculture by using a marine microalga co-product as a feed ingredient. The study is the first of its kind ...
A nasal spray derived from algae and a plant in the tobacco family could offer a preventive measure for COVID-19. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) and...
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animal...
Baillargues, France’s Microphyt, a leading company in microalgae-based natural solutions for nutrition and well-being, has announced a fundraising of €28.5 million (US$32...
Julianna Photopoulos writes in Horizon EU Research and Innovation magazine that UK start-up Skipping Rocks Lab aims to use natural materials extracted from plants and sea...
Sophie Kevany writes in Decanter.com that a group of vineyards in France’s Bordeaux and Cognac regions are exploring whether algae can be used to prevent the fungal infec...
A French think tank called Atelier Luma is investigating whether treated algae can be used as an alternative material to plastic. It showed off the technology last week a...
Researchers at the University of California San Diego and the University of Cambridge have 3D printed coral-inspired structures that are capable of growing dense populati...
Hayley Dunning writes from the Imperial College of London that a new discovery has changed our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite t...
Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought, according to new research led by scientis...