Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Health & Nutrition

Seaweed foraging — the new gourmet sport

January 20, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Dictyoneurum californicum can be used to make the basis of dashi soup stock. Photo: Joy Lanzendorfer for NPR

J dropcapoy Lanzendorfer reports for NPR that, as seaweed continues to gain popularity for its nutritional benefits and culinary versatility, more people are taking up seaweed foraging to eat it fresh, as well as sell it to restaurants in up scale places like Napa and San Francisco.

Heidi Herrmann, owner of Strong Arm Farm in Healdsburg, CA, notes that, “With the rise of those little flavored snack packs of seaweed that kids eat in their lunches, seaweed is now a normal household word.”

Ms. Herrmann commercially forages seaweed. She also leads seaweed foraging classes several times a year. The only equipment her students need is a pair of scissors and a bag to carry the seaweed.

It’s one of many foraging classes offered along the West Coast. They can cost anywhere between $90-$445, and can last for several hours or several days. Some include cooking lessons. Others teach how to harvest seaweed from a kayak.

People have been harvesting seaweed for thousands of years, but now it’s become so popular, you can even take a class. Photo: Joy Lanzendorfer for NPR

The beach is full of edible seaweed. Many West Coast varieties are similar to well-known Asian seaweeds. This includes versions of nori, which the Japanese use in sushi; kombu, the base for the broth dashi; and wakame, commonly used in seaweed salad.

There are also lesser-known varieties, like sea lettuce, a delicate green seaweed also used in salads. Then there’s bladderwrack, which looks like flattened deer antlers and can season meat or thicken sauces. Another is dulse, which looks like red film tape and is commonly dried and flaked into dishes for seasoning.

Seaweeds are algae, not plants. They’re divided into three types: red, green and brown. (Kelp is a type of seaweed.) Like plants, seaweed uses photosynthesis to convert sunlight into energy. While they can be harvested all year, they’re usually at the height of growth in spring and summer. They often grow rapidly, as much as two feet a day.

Because of this, most seaweed can withstand ethical foraging. The important thing is to only take the leaf-like blades and leave the hold-fast — essentially, the roots of the seaweed — intact so it can keep producing.

Read More

More Like This…

Copyright ©2010-2020 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Jessica D'Lima writes in AdvancedScienceNews.com that medicine is moving towards minimally invasive procedures, which have important patient-oriented benefits such as sho...
In collaboration with fellow researchers, chemists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a process that, according to initial calculations, can facil...
Environmental Technology magazine notes that the difficulty in predicting how algae blooms will develop lies in their variform nature. With a multitude of different bloom...
Nestlé has entered into a partnership with Corbion to develop the next generation of microalgae-based ingredients, enabling the companies to deliver sustainable, tasty an...
Paul Brinkmann reports for UPI.com that Florida Atlantic University and three other research schools have launched studies this year to test people who live near the coas...
AlgaEnergy, a Spanish biotechnology company specializing in the production and commercial applications of microalgae, and Yokogawa Electric Corporation, a leading provide...
E.A. Crunden writes in thinkprogress.org that Florida’s first gubernatorial debate was dominated by environmental and climate issues, with an emphasis on the state’s alga...
The Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative, a technology-based economic development program funded by the state of Utah, has awarded a $175,320 grant for...
Hayley Dunning writes from the Imperial College of London that a new discovery has changed our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite t...
Edinburgh-based biotech startup MiAlgae has received an investment of £1 million ($1.3USD) to focus on the commercialization of its microalgae products that use co-produc...
Reebok has introduced a plant-based shoe that is in class with the best performance running sneakers on the market. The Forever Floatride GROW is the latest example of Re...
Alice Klein reports that a skin patch made of living blue-green algae speeds up wound healing in mice and may help to treat chronic wounds in people with diabetes, accord...