www.peopleofthechange.com
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Innovations

NSW looks toward aquatic cultivation

June 26, 2014
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Dr. Pia Winberg from the University of Wollongong

Dr. Pia Winberg from the University of Wollongong

J dropcapamie Radford writes in the Illawarra Mercury that Pia Winberg, from the University of Wollongong, believes that the South Coast of New South Wales, Australia (NSW) is in an ideal position to become a world leader in aquatic cultivation. Dr. Winberg promotes the idea that local aquatic industries such as algae and seaweed cultivation have a range of applications, from sustainable seafood and medical implants, to fuels such as diesel or ethanol.

“The South Coast is home to some of the most unique seaweed in the world,” Dr. Winberg said. “We have hundreds of miles of coastline and the water is clean and clear. We are in an ideal position to take advantage of this technology. Aquatic cultivation is a $5 billion industry worldwide, yet Australia hardly contributes to that at all.”

Dr. Winberg recently co-hosted the 5th Congress of the International Society for Applied Phycology, which was held in Australia for the first time. The Congress brought together experts from around the world to debate the viability of using algae and seaweed as an alternative source of food and biofuels.

The use of seaweed – one of the most nutritionally dense plants in the world – as a food alternative was debated at the gathering. And although some foods, including ice cream and soft cheeses, contain seaweed gel, western countries need to be more open to the idea of seaweed as a food source, suggested Dr. Winberg.

Read More

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
“The Israeli food-tech industry has been growing in leaps and bounds in recent years and is taking a leading role worldwide with a broad range of innovative companies and...
Mimi Cook Hall, has accepted the position of CEO at Phenometrics Inc. after serving three years as the Director of Sales and Marketing, generating sales revenue, and impl...
Cornell University researchers have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many ...
Amy Thompson writes in Space.com that SpaceX successfully launched its 15th Space Station cargo-resupply mission on Friday, June 29; carrying a payload of experiments des...
Edinburgh-based biotech startup MiAlgae has received an investment of £1 million ($1.3USD) to focus on the commercialization of its microalgae products that use co-produc...
Milenio.com reports that BiomiTech, a Mexican company, won a prestigious innovation award for its air purification system at the Contamination Expo Series 2018 held in Bi...
Paris-based Solabia Group (“Solabia”) has acquired Algatech Ltd., a global leader in the development, cultivation and commercialization of ingredients delivered from micr...
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animal...
Alexander Richter writes in thinkgeoenergy.com that Israel-based Algaennovation last week signed a 15-year contract with Icelandic energy utility and operator ON Power fo...
Alice Klein reports that a skin patch made of living blue-green algae speeds up wound healing in mice and may help to treat chronic wounds in people with diabetes, accord...
Jason Huffman writes in UndercurrentNews.com that the Kampachi Company, a mariculture business focused on expanding the environmentally sound production of sashimi-grade ...
Environmental Technology magazine notes that the difficulty in predicting how algae blooms will develop lies in their variform nature. With a multitude of different bloom...