Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Research

Marine bacteria boost growth of diatoms

June 1, 2015 — by Hannah Hickey
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Diatoms are single-celled algae that take many intricate shapes. The Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries used in the study are simple rods that carry out photosynthesis throughout the world’s oceans. Photo: California Academy of Sciences / Flickr

Diatoms are single-celled algae that take many intricate shapes. The Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries used in the study are simple rods that carry out photosynthesis throughout the world’s oceans. Photo: California Academy of Sciences / Flickr

University of Washington oceanographers have found that diatoms – the intricately patterned single-celled algae that exist throughout the world’s oceans – grow faster in the presence of bacteria that release a growth hormone known to benefit land plants. The study, published online May 27 in Nature, uses genetic and molecular tools to discover what controls marine ecosystems.

“These very small organisms are interacting with their environment, but they’re also interacting with other organisms,” said co-author Ginger Armbrust, a UW professor of oceanography. “In my mind, in order to understand how future ecosystems will work, we need to understand how these organisms that are the basis of the marine food web interact with one another.”

Armbrust’s research group has long studied diatoms, microalgae that carry out more of the planet’s photosynthesis than all the terrestrial rainforests combined. Lab members began this project by looking at which bacteria were found in all samples of Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries, a common coastal diatom collected from five places throughout the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Next they cured the water samples of all bacteria living in the seawater, and found that the diatoms did not reproduce as well.

Co-author Shady Amin, a former UW postdoctoral researcher now on the faculty at New York University Abu Dhabi, added the bacteria common to all five samples back one at a time. One type, Sulfitobacter, sped up the growth dramatically when added back at a high enough concentration.

The authors showed that these bacteria exchange material with the diatoms while in turn producing auxin, a well-known hormone made by microbes living around the roots of land plants. “The back-and-forth exchange of materials between these tiny creatures resembles an ongoing dialogue between two living organisms that culminates in the production of auxin,” Amin said. “It was so fascinating that we wondered if we could see this behavior elsewhere.”

So next, the researchers went to sea. Having shown what happens in the lab, they collected other ocean samples and found the same growth hormone. Then they used new genetic techniques to detect the activity of marine microbes that would never survive the transition to the lab. The same interaction was taking place, especially along coasts, but between different organisms that cannot be transferred to the lab.

She predicts that more such interactions will help to explain how ocean waters become or stay productive, or how the base of the marine food web might shift in a changing climate. “A lot of the high-powered tools that look at the function of individual cells were developed in the medical world,” Armbrust said. “Now that we can apply them to the ocean, we are starting to pull the curtains back on how this hidden world works.”

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Read More

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2015 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
New Food Magazine reports that a new Danish project called “Microalgae for Food” has received DKK 750,000 (approximately $110,000US) in co-financing from the Ministry of ...
John Cumbers and Kevin Costa report for Forbes that Berkeley-based biotech startup Checkerspot has announced a partnership with Gore — the makers of Gore-Tex — to use syn...
Susan Kraemer writes in solarpaces.org that to use solar thermal energy to convert farmed algae to fuel, the solar fuels research team at Australian National University (...
Liu Jia reports for the Chinese Academy of Sciences that a “magic soil” made out of modified clays has proven effective in fighting red tide along China’s coastal waters ...
Paris-based Solabia Group (“Solabia”) has acquired Algatech Ltd., a global leader in the development, cultivation and commercialization of ingredients delivered from micr...
Bloomberg News reports that a newly approved Chinese drug for Alzheimer’s will start clinical trials in the U.S. and Europe this year as the country’s first novel therapy...
Alexander Richter reports for Geothermal Energy News that, among the many examples offered during a recent conference in Pisa, Italy, on Perspectives and Impact of the Gr...
Steve Fountain writes in fortstocktonpioneer.com that, amid the 800-page law that last month set the country’s farm policy through 2023, is the expansion of federal suppo...
The 2020 Algae Biomass Summit is going virtual. In light of the continued uncertainty around the global COVID-19 outbreak the Algae Biomass Organization’s board of direct...
Dartmouth scientists have created a more sustainable feed for aquaculture by using a marine microalga co-product as a feed ingredient. The study is the first of its kind ...
The 2019 Algae Biomass Summit, the largest algae conference in the world, kicked off Tuesday in Orlando, Florida, with opening keynote presentations and plenary discussio...
Milenio.com reports that BiomiTech, a Mexican company, won a prestigious innovation award for its air purification system at the Contamination Expo Series 2018 held in Bi...