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Learn spirulina farming — the French way

April 21, 2019
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Apogee’s artisan spirulina farming is based on the French cultivation method

Apogee Spirulina, in association with Santa Fe Community College is offering two 4-day workshops, where students will get three days of hands-on Artisan Spirulina farming, learning the French cultivation method.

The Spirulina portion of the course will be taught by Nicholas Petrovic, proprietor of Apogee Spirulina, gold medal winner of the A.I.M. International Readers Poll for best Microfarm. Luke Spangenburg, Director, SFCC Biofuels Center of Excellence will add his experience in the algae industry, cultivation, technology and integration of environmental solutions to the educational sessions.

The Workshops are being held from July 15-18 and August 26-29, 2019, at Santa Fe Community College, 6401 Richards Avenue, Santa Fe, New Mexico, Apogee Spirulina, near the SFCC campus.

Students will leave with a certificate of completion, an expansive flash drive with pertinent references, a list of preferred venders and a complete starter kit for their own spirulina production once they return home. Each day will consist of ½ day field work and ½ day lecture. As this is a working spirulina farm, activities begin at 6:30am sharp Tuesday-Thursday.

While in Santa Fe, students will also be exposed to the multi-award-winning Trades and Advanced Technologies Center (TATC) departments of Algae, Biofuels, Aquaculture Hydroponics, Solar, Water Treatment and Reuse. Optional social activities will also be planned throughout the week.

For more info: nic@apogeespirulina.com

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