Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Health & Nutrition

Can spirulina boost the immune systems of athletes?

May 2, 2018
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Spirulina may protect athletes’ immune systems from the detrimental effects of strenuous exercise.

Raymond Quan reports for Medicalnewsbulletin.com that researchers in Poland recently investigated whether using spirulina as a nutritional supplement can have a positive effect on the immune system of athletes.

Strenuous exercise regimes of high-performance athletes may actually have a negative effect on their immune systems, resulting in an increased vulnerability to infections, such as those of the upper respiratory tract. Since reducing exercise levels is not an option for these athletes, one possible route to maintaining immunity may lie in the use of supplements.

With this idea in mind, a group of researchers in Poland investigated whether taking spirulina as a supplement could maintain the immune systems of top athletes.

The study subjects comprised 19 men, who were all members of the Polish National Rowing Team.  The six-week study was conducted between March and May, as part of a six-week training camp for the rowers.

The study methodology was as follows:

  • Of the 19 subjects, ten were in the supplement group, and nine in the placebo/control group.
  • The subjects in the supplement group ingested one spirulina capsule (containing spirulina platensis extract, manufactured by GAL) before each of their three daily meals.
  • The subjects in the placebo group ingested capsules containing calcium gluconate before each of their three daily meals.  These capsules were visually identical to the spirulina capsules.
  • On the first day of training camp, prior to any supplements being taken, each rower performed a 2000 m time trial.  Blood samples were taken before, one minute after, and 24 hours after the trial.
  • At the end of the training camp, after all supplements had been taken, each rower repeated the exact same time trial and blood sample regimen.

The results, recently published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition demonstrated the effectiveness of spirulina. At the end of six weeks, the results suggested that the immune systems of the spirulina group experienced protection from the effects of strenuous exercise. This was based on the fact that the related T-cell counts remained constant for this group after the six week period, whereas a weakened immune system would have shown a change in the count. In contrast, the placebo group did show unhealthy changes in T-cell counts after the study period.

The message to athletes is that spirulina may indeed protect athletes’ immune systems from the detrimental effects of strenuous exercise.  More research is needed, however, before a definitive endorsement on this supplement can be made.

Reference: Juszkiewicz et al. “An attempt to induce an immunomodulatory effect in rowers with spirulina extract.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (2018) 15:9

Read More

More Like This…

Copyright ©2010-2020 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Kim Kaplan reports for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, that a microscopic algae could provide a complete an...
Millions of tons of rotting seaweed wash up on the beaches of Mexico, the Caribbean and other vacation spots every year. Partly fueled by fertilizers washing into the sea...
The 2019 Algae Biomass Summit, the largest algae conference in the world, kicked off Tuesday in Orlando, Florida, with opening keynote presentations and plenary discussio...
The Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative, a technology-based economic development program funded by the state of Utah, has awarded a $175,320 grant for...
Judith Lewis Mernit writes in e360.yale.edu that an experiment being conducted by animal science professor Ermias Kebreab at the University of California, Davis, is testi...
Israeli-based Algatechnologies, Ltd. (Algatech) has become the major shareholder in Supreme Health New Zealand, Ltd. (Supreme) to supply the rapidly growing markets in Ch...
Paul Brinkmann reports for UPI.com that Florida Atlantic University and three other research schools have launched studies this year to test people who live near the coas...
Cécile Barbière writes for Euractive.fr (translated by Rob Kirby) that, in large greenhouses formerly home to the tomatoes and cucumbers of the market gardening Groupe Ol...
Global EcoPower (GEP), of Aix-en-Provence, France, has signed a 5-year partnership contract with the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). This ...
E.A. Crunden writes in thinkprogress.org that Florida’s first gubernatorial debate was dominated by environmental and climate issues, with an emphasis on the state’s alga...
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animal...
Bloomberg News reports that a newly approved Chinese drug for Alzheimer’s will start clinical trials in the U.S. and Europe this year as the country’s first novel therapy...