Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Health & Nutrition

Alaskan seaweed may treat diabetes and obesity

May 1, 2014
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

for treating conditions like obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

Bladderwrack is one of seven Alaskan macroalgaes showing potential for treating conditions like obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

Yereth Rosen reports in the Anchorage Daily News that scientists at North Carolina State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute have found extremely high levels of “bioactive phytochemicals” in edible plants gathered from waters and beaches in the Sitka, Alaska area.

A study published last year in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry evaluated the chemical compounds of six species of seaweed and one tidal plant. The tested species were four kinds of brown algae – bladderwrack, sugar wrack, kelp and winged kelp – along with one type of red algae commonly known as laver, one type of green algae known as sea lettuce and a shore plant commonly known as goosetongue.

The results: All seven species contained compounds with potent antioxidant powers, though in varying forms and combinations. For people who eat them, the plants could offer protection against conditions like obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases — all linked to oxidative-damaged cells.

“The tested plants have antioxidant qualities far superior to commercially harvested vegetables and fruits,” said Mary Ann Lila, director of NC State’s Plants for Human Health Institute. She is working with doctoral student Joshua Kellogg, the lead researcher on the seaweed project.

“There’s nothing in the grocery store that can really compare to the levels that we’re seeing in the Alaska seaweed,” Lila said.

These plants are important elements of the traditional diets of some of Alaska’s Native peoples. They’ve been used in soups and stews, dried and sprinkled on fish or other main dishes and eaten alone as crunchy snacks. But those traditional diets have gradually been replaced by mainstream American diets. And as Alaska Natives have shifted away from traditional foods, their rates of obesity and diabetes have risen, as is generally the case with obesity and diabetes among all Native Americans. That is no coincidence, health experts say.

The correlation between decreasing consumption of traditional foods and increasing obesity rates brings up another question: Can Alaska seaweed help ward off excess body fat and the ills it causes?

Follow-up research by the NC State scientists suggests that it can.

Read More

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2014 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Alexander Richter writes in thinkgeoenergy.com that Israel-based Algaennovation last week signed a 15-year contract with Icelandic energy utility and operator ON Power fo...
French researchers have been exploring the potential of algae for boosting the immune systems of animals and reducing the use of antibiotics in livestock farming. Past st...
How did plants make the evolutionary jump from water to land? Scientists think that green algae are their water-living ancestors, but we are not sure how the transition t...
JapanNews.com reports that Euglena Co., a Tokyo-based maker of nutritional supplements, is spending ¥5.8 billion ($5.3 million USD) on building a test refinery that conve...
Susan Kraemer writes in solarpaces.org that to use solar thermal energy to convert farmed algae to fuel, the solar fuels research team at Australian National University (...
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and partner institutions have provided the first published report of algae using raw plants as a carbon energy source. The r...
Gerard de Souza reports for the Hindustan Times that researchers at the CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography Goa (India) have found a cleaner, cheaper method to grow b...
Karly Graham reports that Michigan State University researchers are testing algae hibernation to optimize the plant’s ability to be used for biofuel production. Algae pro...
At the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Science Nordic.com reports, researchers are investigating bioluminescent algae, to determine whether bioluminescent organism...
Mazda is currently involved in joint research projects and studies as part of an ongoing industry-academia-government collaboration to promote the wide-spread adoption of...
Paul Brinkmann reports for UPI.com that Florida Atlantic University and three other research schools have launched studies this year to test people who live near the coas...
Researchers at the University of California San Diego and the University of Cambridge have 3D printed coral-inspired structures that are capable of growing dense populati...