The Buzz

XL Renewables Transitions to Phyco BioSciences

May 12, 2010, by David Schwartz
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

XL Renewables, Inc., as part of it’s marketing strategy, has formed Phyco BioSciences, Inc. to commercialize algae biomass as a food and industrial crop. Phyco is currently developing a commercial production facility near Phoenix, Arizona to meet customer demand. Beginning in 2011, Phyco plans to work with qualified contract producers by providing them a production and harvest platform with algae cultivars in return for a commitment to processing and marketing services.

“We have buyers ready for the delivery of product and the need to scale production,” said Ben Cloud, President of Phyco BioSciences, Inc. “The advances in cultural systems and algae cultivar development provide a significant reduction in production costs that open some very attractive markets now. Phyco has developed a functional production, processing and marketing structure geared to attract capital for expansion and development of new markets for algae biomass, and which are designed to limit the inherent risks of crop production while creating market efficiency and scalability.”

According to Phyco, biofuel is currently the lowest value opportunity for algae biomass and still requires further research and development to become commercially viable. Current demand for higher value algae components provide an opportunity to establish a viable algae biomass industry regardless of further biofuel advances. However, Phyco expects biofuels will become a solid market opportunity in the future. —A.I.M.

For further information on Phyco BioSciences, contact: Michael McCloud, Phyco Business Development, 480-227-2887 or mmcloud@phycobiosciences.com

Copyright ©2010 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com.

FREE Algae News & Updates

Sign up to receive breaking A.I.M. updates!

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
A team of Michigan State University algae researchers have discovered a cellular "snooze button" that has the potential to improve biofuel production and offer ...
William Tucker writes in fullfreedom.org about the lure the oceans have for advocates of biofuel, particularly in Scandinavia. “Two-thirds of the globe is covered with wa...
Most Americans get plenty of protein, primarily from animal products including meat, eggs and milk. But for many, ensuring a healthy protein intake can be challenging. In...
Western Morning News reports that Westcountry scientists in the U.K. are using algae to develop an innovative new method of cleaning up contaminated mine water while harv...
Phys.org reports that, in collaboration with the Berlin, Germany LED manufacturer FutureLED, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed a unique comb...
Designboom.com is showcasing the “Spirulina Fountain” designed by bureau A. The installation constitutes a hybrid, fusing the production basins of the intense blue-green ...
Developing renewable fuel from wet algae is one of the latest innovations Richland, Washington-based Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has successfully driven ...
James Goodman writes in the democratandchronicle.com about Jeffrey Lodge, an associate professor of biological sciences at Rochester Institute of Technology, who knows wh...
Using microalgae to capture CO2 is a complex process, especially in flue gas environments, reports an editorial by IEA Clean Coal Centre in worldcoal.com. There are many ...
Nitrogen and phosphate nutrients are among the biggest costs in cultivating algae for biofuels. Sandia National Laboratories molecular biologists Todd Lane and Ryan Davis...
DENSO Corporation, Toyota Motor Corp.’s largest supplier, has announced that it will build a large test facility to culture Pseudochoricystis ellipsoidea – an oil-produci...
If we built a Green Friendship Bridge composed of 8,600 algae microfarms given to Mexican and Central American farmers in lieu of 1%, (13 miles) of additional border wall...