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Will N. Korea sanctions trigger algal biofuel production?

October 24, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Algae production at the Namhung Youth Chemical Plant. Left to right: Original open ponds in 2010; construction and algal growth as of 2014; ponds under greenhouses in 2016. Click image to enlarge. Images: Google Earth

Brandon Jacobs reports in 38North.com that a new algal research facility just outside of Wonsan, North Korea, suggests a growing interest in developing algae as a strategic resource to diversify sources of energy supplies and improve agricultural production, which could over time reduce the country’s vulnerability to sanctions.

Algae biofuel production could become a strategic resource for North Korea, which is isolated from sources of fuel and lacks sufficient nutrition or fertilizer. North Korea’s adherence to the philosophy of Juche (self-reliance) often drives it to invest large amounts of capital on projects that would otherwise seem futile in a free market economy with global access. For example, it attempted in the early 1980s to reclaim and irrigate 300,000 hectares of tideland for agricultural use. Historical Google Earth satellite imagery shows numerous locations of open ponds and even raceways for algae growth dating back to the early 2000s.

It is likely these open ponds developed organically over time and the original purposes were water control and the production of fertilizer, feedstock and food supplement for rural areas, especially given the famine that had occurred from 1994-1998. But recently, these facilities have gotten more complex, whether the highly organized open ponds outside of Wonsan, or the less organized but almost equally as large facility around the Namhung Youth Chemical Plant.

While the total acreage in the vicinity of Namhung is estimated at only 20 acres, the facility has an interesting feature – the addition of transparent, low profile, hangar-like structures over some of the open ponds. These structures appear to be greenhouses, which will not only enable year-round production, but will also keep the algae clean, which is a strong indication that it is primarily intended for use as a food supplement.

What remains somewhat murky is whether or not these open ponds are being developed as a strategic resource. If this were the case, one clear indicator would be if algae growth was not a by-product or ancillary consequence of some other unrelated purpose, such as water treatment.

While there is greater certainty that the primary purpose of the Namhung ponds is to grow algae, it is more difficult to determine the primary purpose of Wonsan facility solely from satellite imagery. However, it is reasonable to assume that if it were a water treatment facility, it is very likely doing a bad job, because the treated water is apparently dumped back into the river. This strongly suggests the Wonsan facility’s primary purpose is to grow algae.

The strategic value of the algae can be inferred from the total acreage of each site using industry averages to estimate the biomass produced per acre and the protein and lipid content of the biomass. The averages used here are 10 tons of biomass per acre per year with 50 percent protein and 20 percent lipid content. The conversion used for the number of barrels of oil equivalent to a ton of oil extracted from algae is 7.1475. With these figures, the total acreage of different sites already discovered through Google Maps has been totaled; from just these nine separate locations, approximately 4,075 barrels of oil could be produced each year.

But algae have more strategic value than just oil, especially for a country that experienced a famine in the early 1980s that resulted in the death of an estimated 10 percent of the population. The protein and fatty acid content of the biomass is considered to be much more valuable; for the nine selected sites, total production of 2,851 tons of biomass is possible, with a nutritional value of approximately 1,425.5 tons. This nutritional content can be vital to such an isolated population determined to maintain the Juche system. And it can also be used for fertilizer, which may explain the large number of open ponds located throughout the countryside and near farms.

It is not surprising, therefore, that the North Korean government is developing thousands of rural open ponds producing algae and bigger and more sophisticated sites whose purpose increasingly looks like algae production. The purpose of that algae is not immediately clear, but it is a multipurpose resource that can be used to produce food, fertilizer, feedstock and fuel all from the same biomass. Such a resource could certainly have strategic value for North Korea and could, over time, mitigate the negative effects of sanctions both on the country’s energy supply and food security.

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