Webcasts on Algae, Biomass and Wastewater Treatment

August 1, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Two upcoming web conferences will help to spread the word of how algae are being employed in an increasing variety of roles and applications. The Energy Department, in partnership with the Battelle Commercialization Council of Labs, will be presenting a live webcast Wednesday, August 8, from 2:00 to 3:00 PM EDT titled Accelerating Innovation: Biomass. This webcast will highlight several biomass-focused national laboratory technologies, (all of which are found on EERE’s Energy Innovation Portal. )

During this webcast, attendees will learn about “cutting-edge advances in biomass technology such as using cyanobacteria in photosynthesis conversions of CO2 to fuels and chemicals.” Speakers, including Jianping Yu of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will participate in a question-and-answer session at the end of the presentation.

Register now to attend the webcast.

BlueTech Research’s Algae Biofuel & Wastewater Treatment

BlueTech Research will be holding an interactive web-conference titled: Algae Biofuel & Wastewater Treatment, intended for those in the algal biofuel industry who have been reinventing their algae efforts to focus more on low cost wastewater treatment methods. The web conference will be held on Thursday, August 9th, 11:00 – 12:30 PM EDT; 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM BST.

Panelists on the conference will include:

  • Frank Rogalla, Director of Innovation & Technology, Aqualia
  • Tryg Lundquist, Professor, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA
  • Olumayowa Osundeko, Doctoral Research Fellow, University of Manchester/ United Utilities
  • Sue Kunz, CEO, BioVantage Resources, Inc.
  • Moderator: Conor Dennehy, Water Technology Market Research Analyst, BlueTech Research

Topics of discussion:

  • The current state of the art of algal wastewater treatment; removal rates, biofuel yields, currently operating projects
  • Is this a biofuel generating process using wastewater as a feedstock, or a wastewater treatment process that has the potential to generate a biofuel byproduct?
  • Is algal treatment limited to niche application due to footprint and climatic factors?
  • Will biotechnology advances such as genetic engineering facilitate the development of higher biofuel yields and lower footprints?
  • What are the current and future costs and revenue generating potential associated with algal wastewater treatment; and are large-scale algal wastewater treatment projects financially viable?
  • How does this low energy treatment method compare to other incumbent energy and resource recovery technologies such as sludge gasification, low temperature anaerobic digestion and microbial fuel cells?

For further information, please contact: eva.davies@bluetechresearch.com

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