Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about Liqofluxphenometrics515R1
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Research

UAE algae could produce alternative to palm oil

August 21, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Chloroidium ellipsoideum. Courtesy: the CAUP Image Database

Researchers at New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) in collaboration with other groups have discovered that the unique genomic traits that allow local green algae to survive in a desert climate may have far-reaching potential for biotechnical applications.

“The alga belongs to the Chloroidium genus, which we repeatedly isolated from various locations in the UAE,” said Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani, associate professor of biology at NYUAD.

“It has demonstrated particularly diverse properties to suit its surrounding climate, being able to grow in fresh water as well as waters with twice the salinity of seawater, in addition to being able to grow both autotrophically like plants and heterotrophically like fungi or animal cells,” he said.

The study provides insight into the adaptations that this alga has made for it to succeed in this region and concludes that its extensive properties make Chloroidium an ideal candidate for environmental developments.

“Among these unique attributes are an ability to consume a broad range of carbon sources, including desiccation tolerance-promoting sugars and the accumulation of unusually large stores of palmitate. The high concentration of palmitic acid promotes a similar composition of Chloroidium oil to that of palm oil,” said David Nelson, NYUAD research scientist and lead author of the study, which is now published in eLife.

“Being a high-value oil with a global production of up to 60 million metric tons per year, palm oil cultivation has previously been associated with deforestation and the devastation of rainforests throughout Asia, raising significant environmental concerns as many European markets are now banning the use of oil palm in their products,” said Dr.Salehi-Ashtiani. “We believe this alga may provide an environmentally sound alternative to the cultivation of palm oil once it is further developed, and can be of both commercial and environmental benefit to pursue with extensive investigations.”

Comparison has already been made between Chloroidium and other sequenced green algae, revealing the singular nature of the robust and flexible biology utilized by a green alga to successfully inhabit the harsh environment of the UAE’s desert coastline and identifying it as a lucrative subject for further study.

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2018 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
San Francisco biotech startup New Wave Foods aims to address the impact of overfishing, bycatch, water pollution, slave labor, an animal death toll in the trillions, and ...
Karen Phillips writes for deeperblue.com that algae are the alveoli in the ocean lungs of our planet, vitally important to the health of the seas as home, food source, sa...
For plants and algae that carry on photosynthesis, light can be too much of a good thing. On a bright, sunny day, a plant might only be able to utilize 20 percent or less...
Dr. Tom Dempster works as a research professor – focusing on strain selection and development, biomass production, algal biofuels and high-value products, and air and was...
Discovering which algae species is best suited to make biofuel is no small task. Researchers have tried to evaluate algae in test tubes, but often find lab results don’t ...
Dan Wood, at the University of Connecticut, writes that assistant extension educator of marine aquaculture at UConn’s Avery Point Campus, Anoushka Concepcion, spoke about...
The University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research’s (CAER) Biofuels and Environmental Catalysis Group has received a $1.2 million U.S. Department of Ener...
Essen, Germany-based Evonik, and Royal DSM, headquartered in Kaiseraugst, Switzerland, have announced their intention to establish a joint venture for omega-3 fatty acid ...
For algal biofuels to compete with petroleum, farming algae has to become less expensive. Toward that goal, Sandia National Laboratories is testing strains of algae for r...
A Quebec-based company that specializes in the manufacturing and commercialization of marine and seaweed-based products for agriculture and horticulture constructed a new...
Marlene Cimons, nexusmedianews.com reports that researchers at the University of California San Diego and Sapphire Energy have successfully grown a genetically engineered...
Carl Zimmer writes in The New York Times about a team of Australian scientists studying how climate change will alter ecosystems – by using miniature ecosystems, called m...