Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Health & Nutrition

Triton making ingredients for next-generation foods

May 1, 2019
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Triton Algae Innovations recently secured regulatory approval to sell its algae-based protein product. Its algae come in three colors: red, green and yellow.

Elise Reuter writes for the San Diego Business Journal that, with the rise of the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat tacos, and the growing demand for other plant-based products, Triton Algae Innovations is looking to take a big bite of the growing market.

Triton recently secured approval to begin selling its algae-based protein product. An independent source designated its product as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS), enough proof for Triton to begin selling. In March, the company also secured a letter that the FDA had “no questions” about its GRAS designation, another important stamp of approval, as it seeks partners for its algae-based protein.

The company is a spinout from UC San Diego research conducted by co-founder Steve Mayfield at UCSD. It brought on industry expert Xun Wang as its president and CEO, who previously held executive posts at Sapphire Energy and Syngenta Biotech.

Triton now has nine employees and is using contract manufacturing organizations for commercial-scale production. It hopes to scale up its manufacturing as it brings on more commercial partners.

The company currently produces a green, yellow and red phenotype of algae called Heme. A type of iron in red algae, Heme is the component in plant-based meats that makes them sizzle and taste like meat.

While other algae-based proteins exist, Triton’s product is based on a species of algae that hadn’t previously been commercialized, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Though it had been studied extensively in labs, C. reinhardtii wasn’t used in food products in the past because it was dominated by other algae in the wild. But Triton found a way to use a closed fermentation process, similar to the stainless-steel tanks of a brewery, to grow the algae.

It is then dried and ground into a powder form. “People compare it to a wheatgrass or dried parsley flavor,” said David Schroeder, director of corporate and regulatory affairs for Triton.

“We’re in discussions with three or four companies right now that are very interested in (its) potential use,” he said. “We’ve fiddled around with different formulations of our own: pastas, protein bars…we’re excited to see different end uses being devised.”

As algae-based products appear in everything from the health section of supermarkets to fast-food restaurants, Mr. Schroder said the industry looks poised for growth.

Read More

More Like This…

Copyright ©2010-2019 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Sophie Kevany writes in Decanter.com that a group of vineyards in France’s Bordeaux and Cognac regions are exploring whether algae can be used to prevent the fungal infec...
Israeli-based Algatechnologies, Ltd. (Algatech) has become the major shareholder in Supreme Health New Zealand, Ltd. (Supreme) to supply the rapidly growing markets in Ch...
Cyanotech Corporation, a Kailua Kona, Hawaii-based leader in high-value nutrition and health products made from algae, has announced financial results for the first quart...
Judith Lewis Mernit writes in e360.yale.edu that an experiment being conducted by animal science professor Ermias Kebreab at the University of California, Davis, is testi...
Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought, according to new research led by scientis...
The 2019 Algae Biomass Summit, the largest algae conference in the world, kicked off Tuesday in Orlando, Florida, with opening keynote presentations and plenary discussio...
Hayley Dunning writes from the Imperial College of London that a new discovery has changed our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite t...
“The Israeli food-tech industry has been growing in leaps and bounds in recent years and is taking a leading role worldwide with a broad range of innovative companies and...
The Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative, a technology-based economic development program funded by the state of Utah, has awarded a $175,320 grant for...
Trade Arabia reports that the Oman Centre for Marine Biotechnology (OCMB) recently signed a memorandum of understanding with Swedish Algae Factory to support the domestic...
Globally, an increase in water pollution is pushing scientists and environmental care specialists to seek best ways of preserving and maintaining sources of safe drinking...
Susan Kraemer writes in solarpaces.org that to use solar thermal energy to convert farmed algae to fuel, the solar fuels research team at Australian National University (...