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Thrive Algae Oil receives a Best New Product award

May 1, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Thrive® Algae Oil received the 2017 Best New Product Award in the food and beverage category as the top choice for cooking oil.

Algal-based foods manufacturer TerraVia, of South San Francisco, CA, has announced that Thrive® Algae Oil has received the 2017 Best New Product Award, the leading consumer-voted Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) award, from market research firm BrandSpark International.

Determined by the votes and opinions of consumers who purchased the product, Thrive® Algae Oil received the 2017 Best New Product Award in the food and beverage category as the top choice for cooking oil.

Thrive® Algae Oil has the highest level of monounsaturated fat – a “good” fat – and the lowest amount of saturated fat compared to other cooking oils. The product has a light neutral taste and high smoke point (up to 485°).

The algae harvested to make Thrive are grown in large fermentation tanks in a controlled environment. Inside the tanks, the algae consume renewable plant sugars to make oil in just a few days. A 600,000-liter tank of algae will produce 200,000 liters of oil.

Like coconut and seed oils, the algae are expeller pressed, releasing the oil. The oil is refined and bottled, and any excess algae, according to TerraVia, are used for renewable energy.

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