Mining Wastewater

Biosystems and agricultural engineering professor Nurhan Dunford and her team of researchers at Oklahoma State University have spent much of the past five years developing strains of algae that can be turned into biofuels and feedstocks for food or medicines. Currently the researchers are studying strains…

Developing algae to target wastewater contaminants

Sean Myers reports that University of Calgary researchers have found a way to program algae with bacterial genes to target unwanted chemicals and pharmaceuticals that end up in wastewater. Lee Jackson, scientific director of the Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets (ACWA) research facility…

Wastewater Treatment

The release of poorly treated wastewater into natural resources impacts human health and the natural environment. Several wastewater treatment works in the Limpopo Province of South Africa are in high and critical risk situations…

Producing a biofertilizer with microalgae and wastewater

The high concentration of nutrients in wastewaters and in effluents of agro-industrial processes, particularly total N and P, is an environmental problem, and requires costly chemical-based treatments to remove them during wastewater treatment. The ability of microalgae to effectively grow in nutrient-rich…

Transforming the waste from wastewater

Mark Harris writes in the Guardian about a pilot project in Las Cruces, New Mexico, where Dr. Peter Lammers, a professor in algal bioenergy at Arizona State University, along with researchers at New Mexico State University, are diverting effluent from the city’s wastewater treatment plant into rows of long plastic…

Algae-based wastewater system for Cape Cod

CapeCod.com writes about a man in Yarmouth, Massachusetts trying to solve the region’s water quality woes by pursuing a pilot program that uses algae both to remove nutrients from wastewater and also to power the process. Brian Braginton-Smith, president and CEO of AquaGen Infrastructure Systems…