Seaweed: from superfood to superconductor

Seaweed could turn out to be an essential ingredient in yet another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers have made a seaweed-derived material to help boost the performance of superconductors, lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells. The team presented their…

Seaweed driving product development at Algaia

Gaynor Selby writes in FoodIngredientsFirst that seaweed, with its many varieties, is poised to become the next super green superfood, and is finding new product applications in Western markets due to its wide ranging health benefits. Algaia, with headquarters in Paris, France, recently bolstered its growth in specialty marine…

Clean and efficient processing of harvested seaweed

A Quebec-based company that specializes in the manufacturing and commercialization of marine and seaweed-based products for agriculture and horticulture constructed a new processing plant located in the maritime region of the lower St. Lawrence River in Quebec, Canada. This location provides easy…

Seaweed feed company expands reach to UK

Amy McShane writes for Ireland’s Farmers Journal that a local seaweed feed company has secured a deal with a leading manufacturer in the UK. Oceanfeed, based in Milltown, Co. Galway will be joining up with Battles UK, a British manufacturer of animal health and equestrian products. Oceanfeed was…

Seaweed as a wood finish

Benedict O’Donnell writes in the EU Research and Innovation magazine, Horizon, about research being developed on seaweed as a biological, environmentally friendly, sustainable, alternative to oil-based varnish for wood preservation. The NEXT1KOAT project, which was coordinated by Francisco Melero from the…

Seaweed gains ground as food staple in South America

Orlando Milesi reports for IPS News that nutrient-rich seaweed, a regular part of the diet of several South American indigenous peoples, is emerging as a new pillar of food security in Latin America and is providing a livelihood for thousands of people in the region’s coastal areas. Seaweeds have been used as human food…

Can seaweed cure food allergies?

Edible seaweed are low-calorie and packed with nutrients. Now scientists have found that a type of commercial red macroalgae could help counteract food allergies. They report their findings, using mice, in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (May 17, 2016). Food allergies are a major global health issue that can…

17-year-old invents device to clean polluted streams

Chris Weller writes for techinsider.io about 17-year-old Paige Brown, of Bangor, Maine, who created a novel way to pull harmful phosphorus from her local streams – an idea that won her the Global Good Prize and $150,000 in college tuition…

Seaweed growing at the dinner table

Jason Tetro writes in the Huffington Post that the history of seaweed at the dinner table is longstanding. Back in 600 BC, a Chinese author supposedly stated, “Some algae are a delicacy fit for the most honored guests, even for the King himself.” Back then, these water grasses were considered to be a delicacy rather than a source…

MSC and ASC to set global standard for seaweed

The Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) and Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) are working together to create a joint global standard for certifying seaweed operations. The collaboration offers the opportunity to build on the expertise of the two leading seafood certification and labeling programs… [Read the full story]

Senegalese move from fishing to sea farming

Jori Lewis writes that in Senegal’s capital city, Dakar, the age-old profession of fishing is giving way to catching a specific kind of red seaweed, Meristotheca senegalensis, that flourishes in Ngor’s Bay and during a certain time of year washes up on the sand. But what washes up is just a portion of…

Maine Seaweed Farming

Mike Hill, of the Associated Press Television News Service, reports that the seaweed industry is booming in Maine, where more than 20 companies grow or collect marine algae for a wide variety of uses including fertilizer, animal feed, supplements and food sold on store shelves as well as trendy restaurants…

Culturing agent agar hit by seaweed shortage

Ewen Callaway writes in the jounal Nature that restrictions on harvests and exports of Gelidium seaweed in Morocco have affected the global supply of the lab reagent agar. Microbiology’s most important reagent is in short supply, with potential consequences for research, public health and clinical… [Read the full story]

Replacing rice farming with algaculture

A growing number of villages along the Bengal coastline have been plagued by coastal erosion, repeated cyclones and floods — thanks to climate change. As much as 200 meters of coastline have been disappearing annually, according to a 2013 Zoological Society of London study. This has spelled disaster for rice farming…

New seaweed technology drives Australia-China pact

Tania Bawden writes for indaily.com that South Australia’s rich marine environment will yield more value-added products under a new research agreement between Flinders University and one of China’s largest seaweed product companies, Qingdao Gather Great Ocean Algal Industry Group (GGOG). The agreement includes…

India’s macroalgae opportunity

K.N. Murali Sankar writes in the Hindu that macroalgae have been of industrial, human and agricultural value in the Eastern world since ancient times. They gained prominence during the 13th century, after the discovery of agar-agar in Japan and alginic acid on the European continent. For many years seaweeds have…

10 ways to get more algae into your diet

You know algae are a great food source for you. But what are the best ways to eat it? Jami Foss writes in shape.com about 10 ways to eat algae that are common, healthy and tasty too. And no chef skills required: 1. Wrap sandwiches in nori sheets, which you can find at your local Whole Foods Market or online…

Seaweed as a sustainable feedstock of the future

Studies conducted by EnAlgae partners in Ireland, France and Belgium point the way to seaweed being a viable and sustainable feedstock for the future in North West Europe (NWE). This is the conclusion of a new paper entitled “Comparative environmental life cycle assessment of two seaweed cultivation…

Making paper from seaweed

Allan Koay writes in thestar.com about a Universiti Malaya research project paving the way for the commercial production of paper pulp and bioethanol from seaweed. The Algae Research Lab at the university in Kuala Lumpur houses machines – all manufactured in South Korea—for making pulp from a species of red…

Seafarm — a model for Sweden’s farm of the future

In Sweden’s farm of the future, common seaweed is being upgraded from an environmental problem to a valuable natural resource and raw material. “The fact is that algae can absorb nitrogen from the water…

Seaweed – worldwide food of the future

Gareth May writes in munchies.vice.com that seaweed could significantly help feed our planet’s rapidly growing population. The East already eats it and The West will be eating it knowingly in the next 10 years, he says…

With economy in crisis, Spanish entrepreneurs farm seaweed

Channelnewsasia.com reports on three young Spaniards who harvest seaweed, a culinary delicacy, as a way for them to stay out of Spain’s troubled financial waters. 35-year-old marine scientist Alberto…

Alaskan seaweed may treat diabetes and obesity

Yereth Rosen reports in the Anchorage Daily News that scientists at North Carolina State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute have found extremely high levels of “bioactive phytochemicals” in edible…

MSC developing sustainable seaweed standard

The London, England-based Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) is expanding its sustainability standard beyond wild-capture fish and invertebrate fisheries for the first time to include various groups…

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