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Health & Nutrition

Solazyme introduces algae milk

March 16, 2014
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Solazyme’s algae “milk.” Photo courtesy Seeking Alpha.com

Solazyme’s algae “milk.” Photo courtesy Seeking Alpha.com

kdropcapseri Gans at Shape.com reports that San Francisco-based Solazyme introduced algae “milk” at the Natural Products Expo West convention, in Boulder, Colorado, on March 10. The product was touted as being allergen-free, i.e. free of dairy, soy, lactose, and nuts. This makes it potentially a new source for vegans and individuals on a limited diet.

The “milk” comes from algalin flour made from microalgae grown in Solazyme’s industrial fermentation vats. This flour was developed by Solazyme to help food manufacturers make healthier products with lower saturated fat and higher protein content.

The product is reported to contain 50% protein, 20% fibers, 10% healthy lipids plus several micronutrients and trace minerals. Yet to be announced is what the exact nutritional breakdown per eight ounces of this “milk,” and what other ingredients are added.

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