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Solarvest’s first supply agreement for organic omega-3

March 17, 2014
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Solarvest BioenergyVancouver, Canada-based Solarvest Bioenergy has announced that its operating division, Solarvest (P.E.I.) Inc., of Montague, Prince Edward Island, Canada, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for the supply of its organic omega-3 products to the Canadian human nutraceutical market. The MOU provides for a two-year exclusive supply agreement, which may be extended an additional year if certain supply volume conditions are met.

Solarvest and this development/distribution partner, which has yet to be announced, will begin immediately to work together to develop premium organic nutraceuticals for the Canadian market. The collaboration will focus each partner’s strengths; Solarvest’s unique organic process to derive organic omega-3 products from algae, coupled to a substantial distribution network and a recognized brand.

According to the company, Solarvest’s partner has become the leader in this market segment and has made a commitment to seek out products that are produced in a sustainable and environmentally positive manner. Solarvest intends to meet the rapidly growing market demand for omega-3 with a premium organic product line that will provide the opportunity for food processors to enhance and consumers to supplement, their respective products and diets.

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