Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Process

Seaweed farming — new jobs for coastal communities

September 9, 2015
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

The SeaBioGh Project is helping to make seaweed cultivation a business in the fishing communities of Central and Western Ghana.

The SeaBioGh Project is helping to make seaweed cultivation a business in the fishing communities of Central and Western Ghana.

Dr. Gloria Naa Dzama Addico and Kweku Amoako Atta deGraft-Johnson write in Graphic Online about the plight of the fisher folks in Ghana – in the throes of depleting fish stocks, unfair competition and higher costs of doing business. Many of the displaced workers are now turning to seaweed farming as a replacement for their ailing or disappearing fishing businesses and jobs.

In Africa, seaweed production is found mainly in southern and eastern Africa with some harvesting in Senegal in West Africa. In Ghana, brown seaweeds are used to produce high quality alginates, which form strong gels and give thick aqueous solutions. Carrageenans (iota, kappa, and lambda) are obtained from red sea weeds – their main applications are in the food industry, especially for dairy products including ice creams, cheese, and milk chocolates.

There is also a long history of coastal people using seaweeds, especially large brown seaweeds, to fertilize nearby lands. In the horticultural industry, when applied to fruit, vegetable and flower crops, improvements have included higher yields, increased uptake of soil nutrients, increased resistance to pests such as red spider mites and aphids, improved seed germination and more resistance to frost.

The Danish Government has recently launched The SeaBioGh Project — a five-year project in partnership with the Technical University of Denmark, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Water Research Institute and the Chemical Engineering Department of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST).

The objectives of the project include:

  1. making seaweed cultivation a business in the fishing communities, especially in the Central and Western regions of Ghana
  2. establishing relevant technology and local know-how for seaweed farming and seaweed processing
  3. developing selective enzymatic technologies to extract valuable hydrocolloids like carrageenan, alginate and fucoidan from seaweed.

The Project also aims to advance the processing of seaweed for the production of biofuels (biodiesel and ethanol), including bioelectricity.

And, finally, it intends to establish demonstration farms for capacity building for seaweed farming and technology transfer, and produce guidelines/manual for sustainable seaweed cultivation and processing in Ghana and the West African sub-region.

The market is big and inexhaustible, the returns very rewarding. That is why the seaweed cultivation initiative introduced by the SeaBioGh Project has the potential to change the economies and living standards of coastal communities by providing them with alternative credible sources of living and wealth creation. The success of this project will hopefully reduce, in the long term, the pressure on the coastal fisheries sector and thus the fish catch and ultimate recovery.

The writers are with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) Water Research Institute, and CSIR-Head Office.

More Like This…

Copyright ©2010-2020 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Edinburgh-based biotech startup MiAlgae has received an investment of £1 million ($1.3USD) to focus on the commercialization of its microalgae products that use co-produc...
The Swiss Algae Consortium Association (SWALG) was founded in May 2018 as a non-profit organization that serves as a platform for algae-related activities in Switzerland ...
How did plants make the evolutionary jump from water to land? Scientists think that green algae are their water-living ancestors, but we are not sure how the transition t...
Nestlé has entered into a partnership with Corbion to develop the next generation of microalgae-based ingredients, enabling the companies to deliver sustainable, tasty an...
Dartmouth scientists have created a more sustainable feed for aquaculture by using a marine microalga co-product as a feed ingredient. The study is the first of its kind ...
JapanNews.com reports that Euglena Co., a Tokyo-based maker of nutritional supplements, is spending ¥5.8 billion ($5.3 million USD) on building a test refinery that conve...
Sophie Kevany writes in Decanter.com that a group of vineyards in France’s Bordeaux and Cognac regions are exploring whether algae can be used to prevent the fungal infec...
Amy Thompson writes in Space.com that SpaceX successfully launched its 15th Space Station cargo-resupply mission on Friday, June 29; carrying a payload of experiments des...
Alexander Richter reports for Geothermal Energy News that, among the many examples offered during a recent conference in Pisa, Italy, on Perspectives and Impact of the Gr...
San Diego, CA and Kailua-Kona, HI-based Cellana, Inc. has signed an Asset Purchase Agreement with Cyanotech Corporation for the sale of Cellana’s six-acre production and ...
Israeli-based Algatechnologies, Ltd. (Algatech) has become the major shareholder in Supreme Health New Zealand, Ltd. (Supreme) to supply the rapidly growing markets in Ch...
Maiki Sherman, traveling with New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, reports for 1News Now that new innovation partnerships have been signed between New Zealand and J...