Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Research

Seaweed as a sustainable feedstock of the future

July 10, 2015
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Saccharina latissima, aka Sugar Kelp. Photo: intertidal-novascotia.blogspot.com

Saccharina latissima, aka Sugar Kelp. Photo: intertidal-novascotia.blogspot.com

Studies conducted by EnAlgae partners in Ireland, France and Belgium point the way to seaweed being a viable and sustainable feedstock for the future in North West Europe (NWE). This is the conclusion of a new paper entitled “Comparative environmental life cycle assessment of two seaweed cultivation systems in NWE with a focus on quantifying sea surface occupation” published by Sue Ellen Taelman et al.

For the study, the cultivation of Saccharina latissima was studied on both the west coast of Ireland at National University of Ireland in Galway, and in Northern France at CEVA – the Centre D’Etude et de Valorisation des Algues in Brittany.

The study found that the resource footprint of seaweed production in NWE is lower when compared to the footprint of microalgae (Nannochloropsis sp.) and similar to the ones of terrestrial plants such as sugar beets, maize and potatoes.

“There is great potential to reduce the resource footprint of seaweed cultivation when this technology is implemented on a larger scale and becomes more efficient by using less transport and electricity. Furthermore, the biomass productivity can still increase significantly (especially in France),” concludes the report.

“With respect to the type of resources used, more fossil resources are consumed during marine biomass production while more land resources are used for terrestrial biomass production.”

“It seems that marine biomass meets the requirements to reduce pressure on land and fresh water because it grows in marine environments. As it is expected that the energy mix will become more renewable, it is anticipated that the footprint of seaweed production will be even smaller in the future. At that point, seaweed could be cultivated as a sustainable feedstock in (North West) Europe as it avoids much of the competition for land and fresh water.”

The EnAlgae project is led by Swansea University and funded by the European Union under the INTERREG IVB North West Europe program. EnAlgae unites experts and observers from 7 EU member states to determine the potential benefits of algae as a future sustainable energy source.

The manuscript and supporting information are available here.

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2015 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
At the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Science Nordic.com reports, researchers are investigating bioluminescent algae, to determine whether bioluminescent organism...
The Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative, a technology-based economic development program funded by the state of Utah, has awarded a $175,320 grant for...
Sophie Kevany writes in Decanter.com that a group of vineyards in France’s Bordeaux and Cognac regions are exploring whether algae can be used to prevent the fungal infec...
Hayley Dunning writes from the Imperial College of London that a new discovery has changed our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite t...
Nature.com reports that swimming algae have been enlisted to carry drugs to individual cells, raising the prospect that such “microswimmers” could deliver targeted therap...
Skara Bohny reports in Stuff.co.nz that New Zealand’s Cawthron Institute is receiving funding as part of the High-Value Nutrition’s (HVN) National Science Challenge to de...
How did plants make the evolutionary jump from water to land? Scientists think that green algae are their water-living ancestors, but we are not sure how the transition t...
Israeli-based Algatechnologies, Ltd. (Algatech) has become the major shareholder in Supreme Health New Zealand, Ltd. (Supreme) to supply the rapidly growing markets in Ch...
The Swiss Algae Consortium Association (SWALG) was founded in May 2018 as a non-profit organization that serves as a platform for algae-related activities in Switzerland ...
Foodbev.com reports that French marine ingredients company Algaia will install a new specialty seaweed extract unit at its facility in Brittany, France, after securing €4...
Susan Kraemer writes in solarpaces.org that to use solar thermal energy to convert farmed algae to fuel, the solar fuels research team at Australian National University (...
The 2019 Algae Biomass Summit, the largest algae conference in the world, kicked off Tuesday in Orlando, Florida, with opening keynote presentations and plenary discussio...