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SD-CAB Addresses Sustainable Food and Fuel

May 1, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

San Diego Center for Algae BiotechnologyOn May 11-13, the San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology (SD-CAB) is hosting a symposium focused on the potential of using genetics, genomics, and molecular and synthetic biology to enable increased productivity of photosynthetic organisms—both crop plants and algae.

The symposium will address sustainable energy and food production worldwide. Invited speakers will discuss the production requirements of food and fuel in the coming decades, and how to initiate a new “green revolution” in plant and algal biology to help meet the productivity needs of agriculture globally.

Said event organizers, “As the global economy approaches a critical tipping point where global demands for an improved standard of living are exacerbated by declining petroleum sources and increasingly more expensive food, attendees at our symposium will address both of these issues, as well as discuss game changing technologies that increase the efficiency of converting solar energy into food and fuel.”

As part of the symposium, CleanTECH San Diego and EDGE will host a networking event to match up 150 trained EDGE job seekers with biotech and biofuels companies. The event will allow attendees to learn more about the EDGE training programs and the growing pool of job seekers equipped with EDGE biofuels and industrial biotechnology training.

To register, visit http://algae.ucsd.edu/symposium.html.

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