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Schott Glass Tubing for Photobioreactors

September 6, 2011
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

When glass photobioreactor tubes are your preference, whether for the hardness, lifespan, cleaning ease, chemical resistance, or other issues, DURAN® Borosilicate glass tubing from SCHOTT is worth consideration, both technically and economically.

DURAN® tubing has a high resistance to chemical cleaning agents as well as qualities that help facilitate the decontamination of the system. Borosilicate glass also has a very low level of thermal expansion, offering a high resistance to the temperature fluctuations that can be detrimental to polymer tubes.

SCHOTT offers variable tube lengths up to 8 meters, allowing for the construction of large systems with a minimal amount of connecting pieces, thus reducing the risk of areas that can create unwanted algae deposits and fouling.

For more information: SCHOTT North America, Inc., 555 Taxter Road, Elmsford, NY 10523, USA

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