Hot Products

Schott Glass Tubing for Photobioreactors

September 6, 2011
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

When glass photobioreactor tubes are your preference, whether for the hardness, lifespan, cleaning ease, chemical resistance, or other issues, DURAN® Borosilicate glass tubing from SCHOTT is worth consideration, both technically and economically.

DURAN® tubing has a high resistance to chemical cleaning agents as well as qualities that help facilitate the decontamination of the system. Borosilicate glass also has a very low level of thermal expansion, offering a high resistance to the temperature fluctuations that can be detrimental to polymer tubes.

SCHOTT offers variable tube lengths up to 8 meters, allowing for the construction of large systems with a minimal amount of connecting pieces, thus reducing the risk of areas that can create unwanted algae deposits and fouling.

For more information: SCHOTT North America, Inc., 555 Taxter Road, Elmsford, NY 10523, USA

Go to Page

Copyright ©2010-2011 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

Visit the A.I.M. Archives

AIM interview ArchivesAlgae 101 ArchivesHot Products ArchivesInnovations ArchivesMoney ArchivesProcess ArchivesResearch ArchivesScale Up ArchivesThe Buzz Archives

FREE Algae News & Updates

Sign up to receive breaking A.I.M. updates!

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
A team of Michigan State University algae researchers have discovered a cellular "snooze button" that has the potential to improve biofuel production and offer ...
William Tucker writes in fullfreedom.org about the lure the oceans have for advocates of biofuel, particularly in Scandinavia. “Two-thirds of the globe is covered with wa...
Researchers Greg O’Neil of Western Washington University and Chris Reddy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), have exploited an unusual and untapped class of c...
Brian Krassenstein, writing in 3Dprint.com, goes deeper into the recent paper in Engineering in Life Sciences journal discussing the impact 3D bioprinting will have in th...
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing an early warning indicator system using historical and current satellite data to detect algal blooms. EPA res...
Algae “red tide” events often create dazzling nighttime light shows of blue-green bioluminescence resulting from the force generated by breaking waves. While many mysteri...
In Japan, the Algae Biomass Energy System Development Research Center, headed by Professor Makoto Watanabe, was established at the University of Tsukuba on July 1. The ne...
Melissae Fellet reports in Chemical & Engineering News that new materials containing ultraviolet-absorbing molecules found in algae and reef-fish mucus could serve as...
Sarah Zhang writes in Wired Magazine that the single-cell green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have an eyespot that makes use of light-sensitive proteins. One of them is...
With large-scale production at low cost a future possibility, many corporations in Japan are beginning to jump on the algae fuel bandwagon. Heavy industry giant IHI Corp....
Nevele, Belgium-based TomAlgae is developing freeze-dried microalgae for feed in shrimp hatcheries. The company has created its own microalgal “cultivar” and manufactures...
Professor David Sinton of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering has been awarded a 2015 E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship from the Nat...