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SAT Wins Brazilian Bioenergy Innovation of the Year Award

September 19, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

SEE ALGAEIn followup to an earlier story, SEE Algae Technology GmbH, a leading developer of infrastructure for the commercial production of high-quality algae, received the Brazilian Bioenergy Innovation of the Year 2012 Award on 9/18/12 at the annual World Biofuels Markets Congress in Brazil.

In explaining their decision to grant the award to SAT, the independent judging panel assembled by Green Power Conferences cited the Company’s cooperation with Brazil’s Grupo JB (“JB”) as “worthy of recognition” and potentially “a major boost for the commercialization of microalgae-based biofuels worldwide.”

“With more than forty high quality entries, these awards are sending a clear signal that the Brazilian bioenergy industry is making great progress, often times through innovative collaborations, to find efficient, sustainable solutions to future global energy needs,” said Nadim Chaudhry, CEO of Green Power Conferences, organizer of the awards and conference.

The project, currently under construction, comprises an industrial-scale microalgae production plant at the site of an existing JB sugarcane ethanol facility. Once operational, the facility will primarily be utilized to produce bioethanol and algal biomass from both natural and genetically modified algae strains. This algae production facility will utilize SAT’s proprietary photobioreactors to grow algae using the sugarcane facility’s CO2 waste stream as its primary feedstock.

“Winning the Brazilian Bioenergy Innovation of the Year Award proves that the marketplace believes in the groundbreaking work we are doing with Grupo JB,” said SAT Chief Executive Officer Dr. Joachim Grill.

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