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RIT partners with Synergy Biogas on algae project

June 2, 2016 — by Susan Gawlowicz
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Project leader Jeff Lodge, associate professor in Rochester Institute of Technology’s Thomas Gosnell School of Life Sciences.

Project leader Jeff Lodge, associate professor in Rochester Institute of Technology’s Thomas Gosnell School of Life Sciences.

Rochester Institute of Technology and Synergy Biogas are exploring the environmental benefits of microalgae to clean agricultural wastewater and make biofuels. Jeff Lodge, associate professor in RIT’s Thomas Gosnell School of Life Sciences, is running the three-month pilot program at Synergy Biogas – a high-tech anaerobic digester located on Synergy Farms in Covington, N.Y – to grow microalgae on digested biomass. The microalgae will consume contaminants in wastewater and produce an algal biomass that Dr. Lodge will use as a feedstock for renewable energy.

Dr. Lodge will grow the microalgae in a 1,000-gallon tank at Synergy in a process that can be scaled up to treat 52,000 gallons, or 200,000 liters, of wastewater a day. The trial project will demonstrate the organisms’ ability to consume ammonia, phosphorous and nitrogen from digested biomass and reduce contaminants below state-mandated levels.

Dr. Lodge’s laboratory experiments with microalgae have reduced phosphorous in wastewater by greater than 90 percent, to levels of 0.1 part per million, for exceeding the maximum allowable 1 part per million in New York. “My research lab has moved from small scale laboratory experiments demonstrating the significant reduction in ammonia, nitrate, phosphate and coliforms in municipal wastewater to larger scale experiments both in the lab and onsite at wastewater treatment plants,” he said.

Anaerobic digesters produce liquid fertilizers as a byproduct. Microalgae can further reduce phosphorous and other contaminants from the fertilizer to mitigate the impact of runoff into streams and rivers.

“We are truly excited about the opportunity to work with RIT on this innovative approach. It could be a game-changer toward reducing phosphorous loads, which would go a long way towards keeping the Great Lakes free of algae blooms,” said Lauren Toretta, president of CH4 Biogas, parent company of Synergy Biogas. “It increases the overall environmental benefit.”

Dr. Lodge and his team of RIT students will sample and analyze the effects of algae on the digested biomass throughout the summer.

The leftover algal biomass will be repurposed as a feedstock for renewable energy – the researchers will reclaim the sludge to generate biofuels for cars and trucks. They will isolate lipids to make biodiesel and carbohydrates to produce bioethanol through yeast fermentations. The remaining biomass from lipid and carbohydrate extraction is intended to be added to the anaerobic digester as a co-substrate or used as a fertilizer.

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