Faculty and students of the University of Michigan Chemical Engineering department are heating and squishing microalgae in a pressure-cooker in an effort to speed up development of affordable biofuels. “This research could play a major role in the nation’s transition toward energy independence and reduced carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector,” said Phillip Savage, an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the U-M Department of Chemical Engineering and principal investigator on the $2-million National Science Foundation grant, funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, that supports this project.

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