Money

PlanktOMICS spins out of University of Wyoming

May 10, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Stephen Herbert, a UW professor of plant sciences, and UW doctoral student Levi Lowder observe genetically engineered algae they created. Their business, PlanktOMICS, recently finalized a spin-out agreement with UW.

Stephen Herbert, a UW professor of plant sciences, and UW doctoral student Levi Lowder observe genetically engineered algae they created. Their business, PlanktOMICS, recently finalized a spin-out agreement with UW.

PlanktOMICS Algae Bioservices has finalized a spin-out agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) in a deal that will allow the company to further its goal to be an innovative leader in providing biotechnological services and products for the emerging algal biomass industry.

Located in Laramie, Wyoming, PlanktOMICS has developed a service business that expedites the process of domesticating algae for agricultural and industrial production. These services are designed to maximize algal growth and productivity while saving time and money for clients, which include private companies along with government and university labs that conduct research on algae.

Under the license agreement with UW, PlanktOMICS has the right to develop its patent-pending technologies into commercial ventures, says Davona Douglass, director of the UW Research Products Center. In return, UW will receive some equity in the company. When PlanktOMICS begins selling its commercially developed products, the university will receive royalties on the products that employ the patent-pending technologies. Income derived for the university will support other research and patent activities, Douglass says.

PlanktOMICS principal partners Stephen Herbert, a UW professor of plant sciences, and Levi Lowder, a UW doctoral candidate in molecular and cellular life sciences, will focus on serving small companies that need to solve problems relative to their algae needs.

PlanktOMICS provides advanced phenotype analysis (testing biological traits) and screening services, custom algal vector design and construction, algal transformation and gene-expression analysis, according to its website. “We’re here to solve problems for other companies that want to produce algae at large scales,” says Herbert, who serves as the company’s CEO. “We see our role as building up research capacity of these small companies that don’t have enough capacity for research.”

“Our services are tailored to companies that want to outsource their biological studies or biological research,” adds Lowder, PlanktOMICS’ chief technology officer. “We don’t really produce the end products. We do the biology. You have to know how to grow algae. That’s where we come in, to figure out how to farm algae on a large scale (for other companies).”

The five patents that PlanktOMICS has filed to date for its technologies do one of two things, Herbert says. One is to control unwanted algae and other microbes in algae ponds where algal biomass is produced. Part of this technology is to make the desired algae resistant to algaecidal chemicals, similar to how crops, such as corn and soybeans, are now resistant to herbicides used to eradicate weeds. The second technology allows low-cost biological harvesting of algal biomass by causing the microalgal cells to stick together into clumps for easier separation from culture water. This harvesting technology is especially well suited for large-scale production, Lowder says.

Douglass worked with Herbert and Lowder to file patent applications on their novel technologies. The Research Products Center identifies new technologies developed at UW; protects the technologies, usually by filing patent applications; and then negotiates license agreements for the technologies.

“We’re really excited about another Laramie business that will develop UW’s patent-pending technology,” Douglass says. “These are cutting-edge technologies that would never be able to help our country if they were just stuck in the lab. This is a way to get research to the marketplace to benefit society.”

In 2012, Lowder and his PlanktOMICS team were judged the top proposal in the John P. Ellbogen $30K Entrepreneurship Competition at UW. PlanktOMICS won $12,500 and one year of free rent to further develop the company at the Wyoming Technology Business Center (WTBC). PlanktOMICS will take advantage of that rent-free year starting later this summer, says Herbert who, in his academic capacity, serves as Lowder’s adviser.

The WTBC is a statewide business development program (under the UW Office of Economic Research and Development) that is developing a business incubator and an outreach program focused on early-stage, high-growth companies. Lowder termed the WTBC “indispensable” and says the program has helped PlanktOMICS develop a business plan, which included a sales and marketing strategy. Herbert agrees, saying the WTBC “has been extremely supportive” and was instrumental in giving Herbert and Lowder the push to form a company. One key bit of advice he offered: Avoid taking outside investment money until the company is bringing in revenues. “Algal biomass production has a bright future, but you want to make small bets at this point,” Herbert says. “We hope to have (office) space in town within three years.”

“I’m really high on PlanktOMICS. I think they have a really great future,” says Jonathan Benson, CEO of the WTBC. “It’s an interesting business. They have a service business, but they also have technology. They can go a lot of different ways.”

Benson adds the WTBC just finished creating lab space for the company in the business incubator. He expects PlanktOMICS to move into its space during July.

Herbert and Lowder say PlanktOMICS already has two clients, which they declined to name for reasons of confidentiality. However, the two did elaborate that one company has produced algae as nutritional supplements for more than 30 years. The other company produces chemicals that control algae growth, such as in ponds or roadside ditches.

Herbert and Lowder foresee needing 20-25 employees within the next five years.

“We want to create good jobs for people who are trained at UW and at community colleges,” Herbert says.

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Heliae, SCHOTT North America and Arizona State University (ASU) have announced a partnership to bring Heliae’s algae production technology to ASU’s algae testbed facility...
University of Adelaide researchers are using nanotechnology and the fossils of diatoms to develop a novel chemical-free and resistance-free way of protecting stored grain...
Scientists at the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have demonstrated that just two of six iron-sulfur-containing ferredoxins in a represent...
Solazyme, Inc. has announced results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2013. “2013 was a year of great progress for Solazyme as we readied our first...
As the number of photobioreactors in an algae growing operation increases, there is a need for both autonomous control and monitoring of individual PBRs, as well as centr...
A series of articles by Stephen Mayfield and the UCSD Laboratory deserve recognition for their articles on algae-based medicines for malaria and cancer. Mayfield and his ...
Although the use of whole microalgae in animal diets has long been studied, the 
de-fatted biomass of microalgal species, derived from biofuel production research, has on...
By sending algae into space, a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist and his team will be able to study some of the key mechanisms that control plant growth and...
Jamie Radford writes in the Illawarra Mercury that Pia Winberg, from the University of Wollongong, believes that the South Coast of New South Wales, Australia (NSW) is in...
Algae Industry Magazine is pleased to announce a new Algae 101 series by our popular blogger, Mark Edwards, Professor, Arizona State University. The Algae Solutions to Na...
Kyae Mone Win reports in the Myanmar Times that spirulina has been harvested from Twin Daung lake in Sagaing’s Bu Ta Lin township for over a decade, but climate change an...
Starting in the early 70s, agencies in the former USSR invested more than 20,000 person-years of research and development to produce Bio-Algae Concentrates (BAC) that hel...
Algae manufacturer Cyanotech Corporation has announced implementing three major initiatives to improve Astaxanthin production at their Kailua Kona, Hawaii-based cultivati...
Steven Mufson reports for the Washington Post that Algenol Biofuels estimates hackers have attempted to break into its computers 39 million times in four months this year...
Channelnewsasia.com reports on three young Spaniards who harvest seaweed, a culinary delicacy, as a way for them to stay out of Spain’s troubled financial waters. 35-year...
Phys.Org reports that scientists Jolanda Verspagen and Jef Huisman of the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands have concluded that rising CO2 concentrations in the at...
Oregon State University researchers are combining diatoms, a type of single-celled photosynthetic algae, with nanoparticles to create a sensor capable of detecting minisc...
Portuguese cement facility, Secil, and microalgae biotechnology company, A4F, also based in Portugal, have formed AlgaFarm, a joint venture to develop the use of cement f...