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Health & Nutrition

Piveg astaxanthin clears testing standards

February 6, 2014
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Piveg AstaMarine astaxanthin

Piveg AstaMarine astaxanthin

Natural carotenoid specialists Piveg Inc., with production facilities based in Celaya, Central Mexico, has announced immediate availability of natural astaxanthin materials which meet United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Convention and Food Chemical Codex (FCC) monograph testing standards.

Piveg offers AstaMarine®-natural Astaxanthin from the microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis in 5% and 10% oil, 2% and 2.5% beadlets, and a 1% cold water dispersible form. The USP and FCC monographs outline explicit instructions and protocols for the description, identification, assay determination, labeling, and impurity testing guidelines for Astaxanthin Esters.

The advantage and focus of these compendial monographs is to provide a standardized method for the industry to achieve consistent results regardless of the scientist, laboratory, or company performing the analysis. “The industry and our customers will greatly benefit from this standard monograph which we have adopted as it will accurately increase quality assurance and serve the industry as a whole with no ties to any particular product, company, or organization,” said Roberto Espinoza, CEO of Piveg. “Piveg AstaMarine® products are held to the strictest standards to provide our customers with guaranteed quality assurance.”

Piveg, Inc. is a global manufacturer of high specification ingredients for the nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and beverage, feed, and cosmetics industries. Since their inception in 1959, they have specialized in the production, extraction, purification, and manufacturing of naturally-occurring carotenoids.

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