Hot Products

Phenometrics Environmental Photo Bioreactor™

June 21, 2012

Phenometrics ePBR v1.0

Phenometrics ePBR v1.0

The computer controlled Environmental Photo BioReactor (ePBR™) from Phenometrics recreates the environmental conditions such as temperature, light intensity and CO2, enabling scientists to study algae under the same conditions found outdoors in the ponds, but in the more efficient confines of the laboratory.

Researchers can use the ePBR™ to set specific parameters to maintain consistency between experiments. Most importantly, the ePBR™ enables reproducibility, a key factor in algae research experiments.

Each ePBR™ is also a measurement instrument, quantifying growth rates, pH, and other factors in the algae culture vessel, which are displayed on the computer monitor in a graph or data display. It is customizable to accommodate various probes and sensors that monitor algae culture and growth metrics:

  • Variable intensities up to full sunlight (>2000 umol photons m-2 s-1)
  • Pond depth and light penetration reproducing natural conditions in raceways
  • Mixing by sparging or stirring (to simulate raceways)
  • Ability to control and adjust temperature over diurnal cycles
  • Ability to control CO2 and other gasses
  • Continuous measurements of turbidity to estimate growth rates
  • Ability to vary conditions in complex ways by computer
  • Customizable with specialized probes
Matrix of ePBRs in the Kramer lab

Matrix of ePBRs in the Kramer lab

The high throughput data is monitored and controlled via computer with Algal Command or Internet connection in real time. The PBRs can be customized with additional sensors or probes to match the specific research parameters.

The ePBR matrix technology was originally invented in the Kramer lab in the DOE Plant Research Laboratories at Michigan State University. Dr. David Kramer and his team of scientists and engineers invented the prototype to support the Kramer Lab’s algae research.

This technology was presented in a lecture to the members of the NAABB at a conference, who recognized that this instrument could shorten research trials and allow for high throughput data analysis. NAABB provided a grant to continue to develop the technology and ordered 60 ePBRs through Phenometrics, which has a license to commercialize the technology.

For more information: www.PhenometricsInc.com or Rick.Loomis@PhenometricsInc.com

Go to HOME Page

Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Don Willmott writes in Huffington Post about Nevada-based Algae Systems, which has built a test plant on Alabama's Mobile Bay to not only turn algae into diesel fuel but ...
None of us would be alive if sperm cells didn’t know how to swim, or if the cilia in our lungs couldn’t prevent fluid buildup. But we know very little about the dynamics ...
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing an early warning indicator system using historical and current satellite data to detect algal blooms. EPA res...
Simris Alg, a pioneering agribusiness producing omega-3 from farmed algae, has been declared one of Sweden’s 33 hottest companies in new technology. The renowned list is ...
Murdoch University researchers are investigating whether the effluent from piggeries can be effectively treated with micro- and macroalgae so that species of the organism...
Algae “red tide” events often create dazzling nighttime light shows of blue-green bioluminescence resulting from the force generated by breaking waves. While many mysteri...
SciDev.Net’s South Asia desk reports that Indian scientists working on producing biofuel from algae cultured in municipal wastewater are enthused by the findings of a rec...
John O’Renick, in this insightful piece from the Portland (Oregon) Tribune, writes about the problems we create from treating waste streams as garbage to be disposed of i...
Rich McEachran writes in the Guardian that, in the process of surfacing a road, layers of asphalt – which is composed mostly of bitumen (a byproduct of crude oil distilla...
Tom Redmond and Yuko Takeo report for Bloomberg.com that, after 10 years of developing algae as a nutritional supplement generating $37.8 million in annual revenue, Japan...
Studies conducted by EnAlgae partners in Ireland, France and Belgium point the way to seaweed being a viable and sustainable feedstock for the future in North West Europe...
Biocrude oil obtained from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of algae can be an energy-efficient replacement for the fossil crude oil normally used in the production of fue...
The demand for spirulina as a natural food colorant is robust in the North America food processing industry, according to a new study by market intelligence firm Future M...
Nitrogen and phosphate nutrients are among the biggest costs in cultivating algae for biofuels. Sandia National Laboratories molecular biologists Todd Lane and Ryan Davis...
The Asahi Shimbun reports that an experimental facility to produce oil from algae was constructed on former farmland that was abandoned after the March 2011 Great East Ja...