Hot Products

Phenometrics Environmental Photo Bioreactor™

June 21, 2012

Phenometrics ePBR v1.0

Phenometrics ePBR v1.0

The computer controlled Environmental Photo BioReactor (ePBR™) from Phenometrics recreates the environmental conditions such as temperature, light intensity and CO2, enabling scientists to study algae under the same conditions found outdoors in the ponds, but in the more efficient confines of the laboratory.

Researchers can use the ePBR™ to set specific parameters to maintain consistency between experiments. Most importantly, the ePBR™ enables reproducibility, a key factor in algae research experiments.

Each ePBR™ is also a measurement instrument, quantifying growth rates, pH, and other factors in the algae culture vessel, which are displayed on the computer monitor in a graph or data display. It is customizable to accommodate various probes and sensors that monitor algae culture and growth metrics:

  • Variable intensities up to full sunlight (>2000 umol photons m-2 s-1)
  • Pond depth and light penetration reproducing natural conditions in raceways
  • Mixing by sparging or stirring (to simulate raceways)
  • Ability to control and adjust temperature over diurnal cycles
  • Ability to control CO2 and other gasses
  • Continuous measurements of turbidity to estimate growth rates
  • Ability to vary conditions in complex ways by computer
  • Customizable with specialized probes
Matrix of ePBRs in the Kramer lab

Matrix of ePBRs in the Kramer lab

The high throughput data is monitored and controlled via computer with Algal Command or Internet connection in real time. The PBRs can be customized with additional sensors or probes to match the specific research parameters.

The ePBR matrix technology was originally invented in the Kramer lab in the DOE Plant Research Laboratories at Michigan State University. Dr. David Kramer and his team of scientists and engineers invented the prototype to support the Kramer Lab’s algae research.

This technology was presented in a lecture to the members of the NAABB at a conference, who recognized that this instrument could shorten research trials and allow for high throughput data analysis. NAABB provided a grant to continue to develop the technology and ordered 60 ePBRs through Phenometrics, which has a license to commercialize the technology.

For more information: www.PhenometricsInc.com or Rick.Loomis@PhenometricsInc.com

Go to HOME Page

Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
A new, outdoor system at the University of Dayton Research Institute has been producing a high volume of algae since its installation in the summer of 2013, even through ...
Starting in the early 70s, agencies in the former USSR invested more than 20,000 person-years of research and development to produce Bio-Algae Concentrates (BAC) that hel...
Algae manufacturer Cyanotech Corporation has announced implementing three major initiatives to improve Astaxanthin production at their Kailua Kona, Hawaii-based cultivati...
Steven Mufson reports for the Washington Post that Algenol Biofuels estimates hackers have attempted to break into its computers 39 million times in four months this year...
A recent discovery in the multicellular green alga, Volvox carteri,has revealed the origin of male and female sexes, showing how they evolved from a more primitive mating...
In an effort to propel the algae industry forward, the Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership (ATP3) offers a series of hands-on specialized workshops suited for partic...
Channelnewsasia.com reports on three young Spaniards who harvest seaweed, a culinary delicacy, as a way for them to stay out of Spain’s troubled financial waters. 35-year...
Phys.Org reports that scientists Jolanda Verspagen and Jef Huisman of the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands have concluded that rising CO2 concentrations in the at...
The EPA has released the Annual Use of Pesticides in the U.S. Report. We now know that American farmers apply roughly a billion pounds of toxic chemicals intentionally in...
Researchers at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Wädenswil, Switzerland, have succeeded in producing energy-rich gas from microalgae, and in doing so have demonstrated ...
Arizona is taking advantage of its open land and ample sunshine to assume a leadership position in the algae biofuel field. The state is home to two national algae testbe...
With their new CO₂ processing-platform called AstaCos, AlgaeBiotech can produce waxy particles of only 50-100 µm in size with a loading of 25% astaxanthin oleoresin. The ...
Hortidaily.com reports that in Nevele, Belgium, Tomalgae is growing algae in a former tomato greenhouse. Their company was formed when tomato cultivation entrepreneurs Pi...
On September 25, 2014, a photobioreactor for the cultivation of algae was officially unveiled during a seminar at Thomas More University College in Mechelen, Belgium. Und...
William Tucker writes in fullfreedom.org about the lure the oceans have for advocates of biofuel, particularly in Scandinavia. “Two-thirds of the globe is covered with wa...
Most Americans get plenty of protein, primarily from animal products including meat, eggs and milk. But for many, ensuring a healthy protein intake can be challenging. In...
Phys.org reports that, in collaboration with the Berlin, Germany LED manufacturer FutureLED, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed a unique comb...
Allan Koay writes in thestar.com about a Universiti Malaya research project paving the way for the commercial production of paper pulp and bioethanol from seaweed. The Al...