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Paul Roessler Joins Algenol as CSO

July 5, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Fort  Myers, FL-based Algenol Biofuels Inc. has announced the hiring of Dr. Paul Roessler, Ph.D. as Chief Scientific Officer for the company. “Dr. Roessler is joining Algenol at a very exciting time. His extensive expertise in algal biofuels is a major addition to our pioneering research & development efforts as we move toward commercialization,” said Paul Woods, Algenol’s CEO and co-Founder. Dr. Roessler will oversee all of Algenol’s scientific research and development efforts.

Dr. Roessler has over 30 years of research experience involving the physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology of plants and algae. Prior to joining Algenol, Dr. Roessler was Vice President of Renewable Fuels and Chemicals at Synthetic Genomics, Inc., where he led a program to develop renewable fuels and chemicals from cyanobacteria and other types of algae. His background also includes experience at The Dow Chemical Company, Monsanto, and the Aquatic Species Program of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, where he developed technology for the production of algal biofuels. Paul received an M.S. degree in Plant Physiology from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Algenol is a global industrial biotechnology company that is commercializing its patented DIRECT TO ETHANOL® algae technology, projected by the company to enable the production of ethanol for less than $1.00 per gallon using sunlight, carbon dioxide and saltwater, and which targets commercial production of 6,000 gallons of ethanol per acre per year. A pilot-scale integrated biorefinery project to demonstrate commercial viability of the process is under development in Fort Myers, Florida.

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