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OriginOil’s AlgaeAppliance cleaning water for fish farms

June 10, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

OriginOil field testing their Aquappliance™ on location in California’s Coachella Valley

OriginOil field testing their Aquappliance™ on location in California’s Coachella Valley

Technology originally developed by OriginOil to concentrate algae from solution has not only been recently adapted to the petroleum fracking world for cleaning produced water, but is now also being used in the fish farming world to both purify contaminated water and concentrate algae for pelleting to fish feed.

A recent onsite demonstration at a 120-acre fish farm in California’s Coachella Valley – an area where wholesale fish farm closures have occurred in recent years due to the rising costs of energy and feed – was a showcase for OriginOil’s Aquappliance™ to process the ammonia-laden water from a growth pond. The onsite tests quickly demonstrated crystalline water coming out the other end – so clean that the aquaculture manager was able to drink it!

Currently, for each growing pond, more ponds are needed to filter out the ammonia and other contaminants. This multiplies land use and labor costs, because the filtration ponds have to be cleaned regularly.
 OriginOil was able to demonstrate that one machine can just recycle that water continuously, allowing the filtration ponds to become growth ponds.

Though nearly half of the fish we eat are farmed, often those fish have been given large amounts of antibiotics to counter the contaminants present in their growth water. 
By processing this contaminated water and making it crystal-clear, 
OriginOil’s Aquappliance aggressively reduced bacteria, suggesting that it may eliminate the need for antibiotics. This could be a step toward practical wide-scale organic fish farming.

In demonstrating how fast the device was able to concentrate algae, the manager of the fish farm also saw its value in producing algae pellets for fish feed, a feature that in their early growth stages can dramatically reduce costs and improve the nutritional quality of fish.

Adaptation of new technology for multiple purposes is a driving force for a developing industry such as algae, and the evolution of applications for OriginOil’s algae harvesting technology is a valuable example of forward progress.

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