[ad#The Buzz Sponsor Ad]

OriginOil to License CLEAN-FRAC Process to Pearl H2O

October 19, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

OriginOil, Inc. has announced that it has signed its first agreement to license OriginOil’s proprietary CLEAN-FRAC™ process to oil and gas water treatment firm Pearl H2O.

The agreement is the first in the company’s “Powered by OriginOil™” strategy of deploying their unique technology across global markets to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) who will integrate it seamlessly into their systems and under their own brand.

Pearl H2O intends to integrate OriginOil’s CLEAN-FRAC as the first step in its own continuous-process oil and gas frack water recovery and cleanup system. Pearl plans to deploy a showcase system before year-end, which is expected to result in first licensing revenues to OriginOil in early 2013.

Pearl H2O LLC is a newly funded Fountain Valley, California-based company founded by Pacific Advanced Civil Engineering (PACE)’s shareholders to develop new technology, primarily in the water and energy fields, and bring commercial viable solutions to the marketplace.

Under the terms of the OEM agreement, OriginOil has granted a non-exclusive license to Pearl H2O to bundle OriginOil’s high-speed and chemical-free CLEAN-FRAC technology with Pearl H2O’s frac water cleanup system, with royalties as a share of overall revenue paid to OriginOil.

OriginOil’s CLEAN-FRAC process is based on the company’s Solids Out of Solution™ technology that efficiently removes oils, suspended solids, insoluble organics and bacteria from produced or “frac flowback” water, on a continuous flow basis and without the use of chemicals.

More Buzz…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Tess Riley writes in TheGuardian.com about how spirulina may be able to combat malnutrition in developing countries. Spirulina is one of the oldest life forms on Earth, c...
Caroline Scott-Thomas reports on Food Navigator about an online algae discussion on the social media site Reddit where Mars' chief agricultural officer Howard-Yana Shapir...
A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Energy Technologies Office (BETO) project, awarded to Cal Poly (California Polytechnic State University) in collaboration with M...
Montague, Prince Edward Island-based Solarvest has announced that it has used its algal-based production platform to express bioactive therapeutic proteins. The proof of ...
K. S. Rajgopal writes in thehindu.com about a new study that demonstrates how macroalgal biomass from Gelidiella acerosa and Gracilaria dura collected from Adri and Verav...
SciDev.Net’s South Asia desk reports that Indian scientists working on producing biofuel from algae cultured in municipal wastewater are enthused by the findings of a rec...
Nurit Canetti writes in Israeli Pulse that Rwandan agronomists are on a one-year visit to Israel to study various aspects of Israeli agriculture firsthand. Primarily they...
Hannah Osborne writes in the International Business Times that algae has been genetically engineered to kill cancer cells without harming healthy cells. The algae nanopar...
The Algae and Biofuels Laboratory at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) is partnering with Lianhenghui Investment Company to construct a...
A multiple-effect evaporator (MEE) is a system designed for efficiently using the heat from steam to evaporate water. This equipment is recommended by pollution control a...
Algaculture, or algae farming, like any form of agriculture, is highly sensitive to fertilizer costs. A major roadblock to commercial algae farming is efficient utilizati...
Scientists at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire, have discovered that marine microalgae can completely replace the wild fish oil currently used to feed tilapia...