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OriginOil Teams with CWT for Wastewater Clean-up

June 8, 2012

AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Los Angeles, CA-based OriginOil is gearing up for the commercial roll out of its oil and gas wastewater clean-up systems, and has selected Clean Water Technology (CWT), based in Los Angeles, to manufacture the company’s systems. OriginOil will work with water engineering specialists PACE to develop the first commercial units, designed to help process up to 1 barrel of petroleum-contaminated “frac flowback” water per minute, or up to 60,000 gallons per day.

CWT was chosen for its expertise in the wastewater industry and for its previous success building OriginOil-engineered systems. To shorten time to market, CWT plans to adapt the shells of its own wastewater treatment units already on hand. “At this phase, Clean Water Technology represents what we need in a manufacturer for the rollout and commercialization of this technology,” said Riggs Eckelberry, CEO of OriginOil. “When we had to scale up fast for our Australian algae harvesting pilot program, CWT delivered. We’re pleased that they have found a way to manufacture these units quickly so that we can prove ourselves in the oil fields this summer.”

“We believe we can quickly roll out OriginOil’s water remediation systems by building their equipment into our existing wastewater treatment units,” said Wade Morse, CWT’s chief operating officer. “OriginOil’s system is modular and can easily be dropped into existing equipment in the field.”

OriginOil recently announced the signing of a memorandum of understanding with Fountain Valley, CA-based PACE to collaborate with oil field operators in Texas and elsewhere to improve petroleum recovery and water cleaning for re-use at well sites, using a process originally developed for algae harvesting.

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