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OriginOil launches Model A60 mid-sized algae harvester

August 15, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

The Model A60 is a pilot scale, low-cost algae harvester providing a low energy, chemical-free, continuous flow ‘wet harvest’ system to efficiently dewater and concentrate the microalgae.

The Model A60 is a pilot scale, low-cost algae harvester providing a low energy, chemical-free, continuous flow ‘wet harvest’ system to efficiently dewater and concentrate the microalgae.

OriginOil, Inc. has launched its mid-sized algae harvester, designated the EWS Algae A60, for distributed algae production architectures. The new harvester, designed with producer input, processes 60 liters (16 gallons) per minute of algae water. Individual A60 units can each be assigned to manage a pond or bioreactor assembly of up to 500,000 liters. Units can be combined to achieve massively parallel processing capability.

The A60 is a continuous flow ‘wet harvest’ system to efficiently dewater and concentrate microalgae. It can remove up to 99 percent of the incoming water volume and produce a 5 percent solids concentrate, with accessories available for higher concentrations.

“We carefully sized this harvester to meet the distributed processing demands of algae producers,” said Jose Sanchez, OriginOil’s VP of quality assurance and services. “Our clients can scale up gradually, they can shut down an individual harvester for pond stoppages, and they also have redundancy.”

The A60 design is also specifically designed for aquaculture, a new global application for algae production. “At a time when fish feed costs are exploding, fish farms are looking to adopt algae cultivation in a big way. Not only is algae about a third the cost of conventional feeds, but it is also extremely nutritious. The new A60 is ideally sized to harvest algae product for fish feed. It will soon be in place at our permanent showcase near the Salton Sea in Southern California,” said Sanchez.

For more information: A60

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