Scale Up

Olmix opens algae biorefinery in Brittany

September 13, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

European feed additives manufacturer Olmix opened their first algae biorefinery this month, near the commune of Plouénan, in northern Brittany, France. The plant was constructed by Olmix along with four other industrial partners from Brittany in a consortium named Ulvans — an acronym for ‘Ulves Valorisation Nutrition Santé’. The consortium also includes two French research centers, the University of South Brittany and CNRS of Mulhouse.

Olmix’ focus is on algae from seaweeds, as they provide a rich source of nutrients, and are very useful in pig and poultry production – rich sources of minerals, polysaccharides and proteins.

Olmix biorefinery

Take a tour of the new Olmix biorefinery by the numbers:

  1. Harvesting algae — collection from boat, collection in shallow water from the beach.
  2. Satellite tracking sheets of seaweed — facilitates the geolocation for collection from boat.
  3. Pre-processing the algae – washing, grinding.
  4. Extraction of active molecules — enzymatic hydrolysis for the release of active ingredients from seaweed without solvent (first molecules for animal and vegetal health,) centrifugation (purification,) drying.
  5. Clay extraction — second essential natural product: Montmorillon’s clay recognised for its quality and stability.
  6. Pre-processing the clay — crushing, drying, grinding ball and dynamic selection to obtain superfine clay and optimise the interaction with algae but also the action in the digestive tract.
  7. Formulations based on natural products for animal and plant health and nutrition: Amadéite; incorporation of seaweed extract in the interlayer space of the clay to develop new active ingredients in parallel to a research laboratory with the beneficial properties of algae (antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer)
  8. Finished products for different markets: Melspring (vegetable crops in greenhouses and orchards); PRP (open field cultures); Olmix and Amadéite (animal nutrition, hygiene and health)
  9. Aquaculture — replacement of fish protein with sustainable solutions such as algae.
  10. Applications — exportations

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