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Health & Nutrition

Non-GMO Project Verification for bulk BioAstin®

September 22, 2016
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Cyanotech's BioAstin is pesticide and herbicide free, and does not contain genetically modified organisms.

Cyanotech’s BioAstin is pesticide and herbicide free, and does not contain genetically modified organisms.

kdropcapsailua-Kona, Hawaii-based Cyanotech Corporation has announced that its bulk raw material BioAstin® SCE products have received Non-GMO Project Verification.

“We are very excited about this verification as it leads to receiving Non-GMO Project Verification for our finished goods,” said Dr. Gerald Cysewski, Interim President and Chief Executive Officer of Cyanotech. “Our top priority is to provide the highest quality microalgae products.”

BioAstin Natural Astaxanthin is a potent natural antioxidant derived from natural microalgae, Haematococcus pluvialis, cultivated and grown on the Kona coast of the Big Island of Hawaii.

The Non-GMO Project is the first entity in North America that offers third-party verification and labeling for products made according to rigorous best practices for GMO avoidance, and the associated seal is a sign that a product is produced through best practices for GMO avoidance.

“BioAstin Natural Astaxanthin is now a Non-GMO Project Verified ingredient. Our BioAstin® is also certified Gluten-Free, and it’s the first brand to receive the Natural Algae Astaxanthin Association’s (NAXA) Verification Seal,” said Dr. Cysewski.

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