Research

NMSU student researchers Alexander Pertusini, Zach Hale and Lily Timmons discuss their work with Tracey Carrillo, assistant director of campus farm operations while standing next to a 4,300-gallon shrimp tank at NMSU's Leyendecker Plant Science Research Center.

NMSU student researchers Alexander Pertusini, Zach Hale and Lily Timmons discuss their work with Tracey Carrillo, assistant director of campus farm operations while standing next to a 4,300-gallon shrimp tank at NMSU's Leyendecker Plant Science Research Center. Photo: Jay A. Rodman/NMSU

NMSU Feeding Algae, Cottonseed to Shrimp

July 17, 2012, by Justin Bannister/jbannist@nmsu.edu
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Researchers at New Mexico State University, in Las Cruces, are researching whether a mix of algae and cottonseed meal can make it economically viable for farmers to grow shrimp in the Desert Southwest.

“If you want to have fresh shrimp in New Mexico, why not grow it here if you can?” said Wiebke Boeing, an associate professor in NMSU’s Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Ecology. She specializes in aquatic ecology and is heading up the study sponsored by Cotton Inc. and the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products.

Boeing said the economic development impact of a shrimp industry in the state could be significant. Earlier this year, she visited shrimp farms in Michigan where shrimp farmers have trouble keeping up with demand. She said the same could happen in New Mexico.

Right now, the biggest expenses for shrimp farmers around the country include the price of commercial feed and the cost of electricity needed to keep the water in shrimp tanks at the appropriate temperature. While New Mexico’s climate could easily solve the cost of heating, Boeing’s research is aimed at solving the price of feed.

“…marine algae should be cheaper and more sustainable, and therefore attract the attention of shrimp farmers.”

She said previous research has shown glandless cottonseed meal can replace a portion of fishmeal, as long as fish oil is supplemented into the feed. Boeing believes a shrimp diet that replaces the remaining fish products with marine algae should be cheaper and more sustainable, and therefore attract the attention of shrimp farmers.

Over the next year, she’ll develop shrimp feed with varying mixtures of glandless cottonseed meal and algae. From there, she’ll measure the survival and food conversion ratio of shrimp grown in aquariums using five different feed mixtures. Pacific White Shrimp will be used for the experiments. The algae used will be grown at the Solix photobioreactor at NMSU’s Leyendecker Plant Science Center.

“In the end, it all comes down to sustainability,” she said. “With a growing human population, we have to think more and more about ways to eliminate waste. If an algae industry for making biodiesel takes off, New Mexico could become a hot spot. Using algae in shrimp farming would complement the biodiesel industry.”

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2012 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Kazuaki Nagata reports from Japan that while the Fukushima nuclear disaster has prompted vigorous discussion about alternative energy in Japan, there is a lack of a paral...
The Guardian reports that Prince Edward Island (P.E.I.), Canada-based Solarvest has created an inventive system utilizing a specific algal strain to grow and produce EPA ...
Jamie Radford writes in the Illawarra Mercury that Pia Winberg, from the University of Wollongong, believes that the South Coast of New South Wales, Australia (NSW) is in...
Algae Industry Magazine is pleased to announce a new Algae 101 series by our popular blogger, Mark Edwards, Professor, Arizona State University. The Algae Solutions to Na...
Steven Mufson reports for the Washington Post that Algenol Biofuels estimates hackers have attempted to break into its computers 39 million times in four months this year...
Channelnewsasia.com reports on three young Spaniards who harvest seaweed, a culinary delicacy, as a way for them to stay out of Spain’s troubled financial waters. 35-year...
Using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are driving the life-and-death d...
SCHOTT AG, of Mitterteich, Germany, and Algatechnologies Ltd. (Algatech), based at Israel’s Kibbutz Ketura, have signed an R&D agreement to strengthen their partnersh...
Biplab Das reports in NatureAsia.com that a research team has found aqueous extracts of the marine brown algae Lobophoro variegate that can inhibit the replication of hum...
U.S. farmers and biofuels makers are watching for the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) final decision on the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard rules, which will set t...
With their new CO₂ processing-platform called AstaCos, AlgaeBiotech can produce waxy particles of only 50-100 µm in size with a loading of 25% astaxanthin oleoresin. The ...
MicroBio Engineering, Inc., of San Luis Obispo, California, has introduced a full suite of open pond microalgae growth systems designed for quick deployment of research- ...
Solazyme, Inc. and Versalis, the chemical subsidiary of Eni S.p.A., one of the world’s largest oil and gas companies, today announced a partnership to expand the commerci...
Hortidaily.com reports that in Nevele, Belgium, Tomalgae is growing algae in a former tomato greenhouse. Their company was formed when tomato cultivation entrepreneurs Pi...
On September 25, 2014, a photobioreactor for the cultivation of algae was officially unveiled during a seminar at Thomas More University College in Mechelen, Belgium. Und...
Most Americans get plenty of protein, primarily from animal products including meat, eggs and milk. But for many, ensuring a healthy protein intake can be challenging. In...
Western Morning News reports that Westcountry scientists in the U.K. are using algae to develop an innovative new method of cleaning up contaminated mine water while harv...
Phys.org reports that, in collaboration with the Berlin, Germany LED manufacturer FutureLED, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed a unique comb...