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Technology

New algae-delivered vaccination technology for fish

August 18, 2016
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Antonio Lamb (left) and Simon Porphy Jegathese, co-founders of MicroSynbiotiX Ltd.

Antonio Lamb (left) and Simon Porphy Jegathese, co-founders of MicroSynbiotiX Ltd.

Peter O’Dwyer writes in the Irish Examiner that approximately 5% of the world’s fish stock is lost to infectious disease at a cost of more than $10+ billion annually. MicroSynbiotiX, headquartered in Cork City, Ireland, has developed an oral vaccine hidden within microalgae that fish eat, aiming to reduce those losses significantly.

“We lock the vaccine inside of the microalgae. The technology is based on feeding the vaccine locked in the microalgae to the fish and the natural digestion process of the fish unlocks the vaccine and triggers an immune response,” company co-founder Antonio Lamb said.

“The way the industry does disease management now for most aquaculture farms is that they administer a pretty excessive use of antibiotics which end up in the food, which ultimately ends up in the diets of people that eat the fish. It also gets expelled as effluents into the environment. So our technology would allow people to immunise farm-raised seafood sustainably, and vaccinate against different diseases that wipe out farms without having to use harmful antibiotics or antimicrobials,” he said.

MicroSynbiotiX was founded by Mr. Lamb, originally from Sweden, along with Simon Porphy Jegathese, from India, and native New Yorker, Sebastian Cocioba. Having participated in the IndieBio biotech accelerator in Cork, the firm has established its headquarters there, and also has lab space in California and New York.

The company’s workload will now be split into two strands with one based in Ireland and the other in the US. “We would like to do the initial strain development in the US, since we have several state-of-the-art laboratory facilities there already, and then continue that research in microalgal industrial scale-up through an Irish university gateway. We would then like to set up the industrial manufacturing and export of the product from Ireland,” Mr. Lamb said.

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