Research

Neste Oil ups algae research for biodiesel

January 31, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Neste Oil’s field trials in Andalusia, Spain

Algae have been grown in tubular photobioreactors made out of plastic tubing in Neste Oil’s field trials in Andalusia, Spain.

Neste Oil, ranked the world’s fourth most sustainable company on The Global 100 list at the World Economic Forum in Davos, has been investigating the suitability of algae for its renewable fuels production for some years; its research showing that algae oil represents a suitable raw material for producing its NExBTL renewable diesel.

Although algae cannot yet be cultivated on an industrial scale, they appear to be a promising future renewable raw material, according to company researchers who concur that the microscopically small organisms offer high oil yields, and cultivation does not require potable water, as they can be grown in salt water or wastewater. The developers at Neste also appreciate that algae also do not compete for land areas with food production, so they can be cultivated on land unsuitable for farming.

“Algae represent an exceptionally good alternative as a raw material in terms of their greenhouse gas balance, which makes research in the area very attractive,” says Pauliina Uronen, an algae researcher at Neste Oil.

Neste Oil is collaborating with a number of Finnish and international organizations in the algae research area. A research project was launched with the Marine Research Centre of the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE) in 2011 to test the lipid production capacity of different types of algae and analyze how adjusting growing conditions can optimize the quality and quantity of these lipids. Neste Oil is also a member of major international algae research consortia based in Australia (SBRC) and the Netherlands (AlgaePARC).

Neste Oil has carried out its own field trials in Andalusia, in southern Spain, focused on studying how algae behave and how they can be cultivated outside the laboratory. “Trials like this can reveal a number of surprising issues that are not addressed by laboratory work, as field trial conditions cannot be controlled in the same way. How different times of the day can affect algae growth is a good example of this,” said Pauliina Uronen. “Spain is ideal for algae cultivation because of the high amounts of sunlight.”

The projects in Andalusia were conducted in co-operation with Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
As of March 1, 2015, bbi-biotech GmbH, of Berlin, Germany, has begun integrating IGV Biotech GmbH’s photobioreactors into its own life science product portfolio. A former...
Hammenhög, Sweden-based agribusiness Simris Alg has announced the launch of its first consumer products. The algae farmers’ exclusive omega-3 supplements and superfoods w...
As one of the most water-poor countries in the world, Jordan’s current water resources are significantly below the global water scarcity line. Annual rainfall falls under...
K. S. Rajgopal writes in thehindu.com about a new study that demonstrates how macroalgal biomass from Gelidiella acerosa and Gracilaria dura collected from Adri and Verav...
Algae.Tec has announced a collaboration agreement for the commercialization of its algae production technology with Larimar Energy SRL, of the Dominican Republic. The ene...
Tubular glass photobioreactor (PBR) systems protect algae from harmful environmental factors, keeping strains safer from bio-contamination. The glass tubing itself can be...
Scientific representatives from the EnAlgae consortium are announcing preliminary results this week from a key algal carbon capture project in the works at Britain’s larg...
Japan’s IHI Corporation has announced that they have succeeded in stably cultivating a modified high-output algal strain in a 1,500 square meter open pond in Kagoshima, K...
Using microalgae to capture CO2 is a complex process, especially in flue gas environments, reports an editorial by IEA Clean Coal Centre in worldcoal.com. There are many ...
In Japan, the Algae Biomass Energy System Development Research Center, headed by Professor Makoto Watanabe, was established at the University of Tsukuba on July 1. The ne...
Nurit Canetti writes in Israeli Pulse that Rwandan agronomists are on a one-year visit to Israel to study various aspects of Israeli agriculture firsthand. Primarily they...
You know algae are a great food source for you. But what are the best ways to eat it? Jami Foss writes in shape.com about 10 ways to eat algae that are common, healthy an...
Bigelow Laboratory, of East Boothbay, Maine, and the University of Mississippi have formed a five-year Strategic Inter-Institutional Partnership Agreement for collaborati...
Astaxanthin has been widely used in the aquaculture industry for pigmentation of salmon, trout and shrimp; used for its antioxidant and other health benefits in the nutra...
MicroBio Engineering, Inc. has announced a new line of 100 and 1,000 liter Algae Raceways™, building on the success of their popular 0.5 m2 (5.5 ft2) and 3.5 m2 (40 ft2),...