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Nativis’ Voyager™ technology may increase algae survival

June 9, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Nativis, Inc., a clinical stage life science bio-electronic company developing non-invasive, safe and highly effective treatments for cancers and other serious diseases, has announced the use of the same technology to inhibit a key enzyme in algae. The paper entitled “Non-Thermal Radio Frequency Stimulation Inhibits the Tryptophan Synthase Beta Subunit in the Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii” presented proof of concept data demonstrating the ability of the Nativis signal transduction technology to increase algae survival by altering specific enzyme levels in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

Chris Rivera, Nativis President and CEO said, “We are very excited to have the first proof of concept work show the Voyager™ system technology can be adapted to inhibit the synthesis of the enzyme tryptophan synthase beta subunit (MAA7) by applying an electro-magnetic-field (EMF) with our ulRFE technology derived from a published siRNA.

“The results of this research have encouraged us to continue with further investigation to explore and identify other key enzymes that regulate lipid production and the commercial viability of this technology. This could also lead to tailoring proteins from algae resulting in greater concentration for feedstock and other uses, all without using any chemical interactions.”

Regarding the commercial viability of this technology, Michael Mischke-Reeds, Nativis Senior Vice President for Business Development said, “There are over 30 major companies worldwide that are operating in the algae sector. Out of those companies, about one-third are actively engaged in biofuel production. The leading companies in this fast-growing sector are growing algae for cosmetics, nutraceuticals, and/or feedstock. Products include omega-3, omega-7, astaxanthin, beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin.

“You can see the market potential of our technology if we can significantly increase efficiency of algae production with minimal impact on cost. Other applications of the Nativis technology are in health maintenance of algae (by inhibiting infective agents), thus reducing costs of treatment or loss of whole ponds.”

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