Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about LiqofluxPhenometrics Buy 3 Get 1 Free
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Innovations

Microalgae delivering targeted medicines

October 24, 2018
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

A swimming algal cell (green) with attached spherical cargo carriers (red) that can be loaded with drugs.
Credit: O. Yasa et al./Adv. Mater.

Nature.com reports that swimming algae have been enlisted to carry drugs to individual cells, raising the prospect that such “microswimmers” could deliver targeted therapies.

Miniscule devices propelled by living organisms can “swim” through the body to deliver cargo such as doses of drugs. A variety of organisms have been joined with artificial structures to treat some tumors, but the most commonly used organisms – bacteria – can be toxic and multiply rapidly, limiting their use.

As an alternative, Metin Sitti and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, Germany, tested the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Nontoxic and biodegradable, it moves by lashing a propeller-like tail. The researchers outfitted individual algal cells with magnetic polymer beads that could hold drugs in small amounts and allowed the researchers to steer the algae by applying a magnetic field to them.

In the lab, these microswimmers darted through bodily fluids such as blood at more than 100 micrometres per second and successfully deposited payloads onto mammalian cells. The authors plan future in vivo tests to determine the algal cell’s compatibility with the human immune system.

Read More

More Like This…

Copyright ©2010-2019 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Cody Nelson writes for MPRNews.org that a team of University of Minnesota-Duluth researchers wanted to know how shortening winters — and less ice cover on lakes — might i...
Sophie Kevany writes in Decanter.com that a group of vineyards in France’s Bordeaux and Cognac regions are exploring whether algae can be used to prevent the fungal infec...
According to Vegconomist.com, advanced ingredients company Noblegen, creator of proteins, carbohydrates, and oil ingredients from the single celled microorganism Euglena ...
Amy Thompson writes in Space.com that SpaceX successfully launched its 15th Space Station cargo-resupply mission on Friday, June 29; carrying a payload of experiments des...
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animal...
The Swiss Algae Consortium Association (SWALG) was founded in May 2018 as a non-profit organization that serves as a platform for algae-related activities in Switzerland ...
Israeli-based Algatechnologies, Ltd. (Algatech) has become the major shareholder in Supreme Health New Zealand, Ltd. (Supreme) to supply the rapidly growing markets in Ch...
Foodbev.com reports that French marine ingredients company Algaia will install a new specialty seaweed extract unit at its facility in Brittany, France, after securing €4...
Julianna Photopoulos writes in Horizon EU Research and Innovation magazine that UK start-up Skipping Rocks Lab aims to use natural materials extracted from plants and sea...
The Algae Biomass Organization (ABO) reports the introduction of the Algae Agriculture Act of 2018 (H.R. 5373), a bill that would give algae cultivators and harvesters ma...
Jack Perry reports for the (Rhode Island) Providence Journal that Matthew Bertin, an assistant professor of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences at University of Rhode ...
Gerard de Souza reports for the Hindustan Times that researchers at the CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography Goa (India) have found a cleaner, cheaper method to grow b...