[ad#PhycoBiosciences AIM Interview]

Research

Marin Sawa using algae to 3-D print health food

September 10, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Algerium Bioprinter developer Marin Sawa

Algerium Bioprinter developer Marin Sawa

Leah Gonzalez writes in psfk.com about Marin Sawa’s Algaerium Bioprinter, a device that explores the personal, digital printing of nourishment using algae as the base media. Sawa’s project is in the context of creating a future where farming crops like Chlorella, Spirulina, and Haematococcus are building blocks of urban agriculture.

In collaboration with Imperial College London, Sawa is studying inkjet-printing technology ­– suitable for printing with algae. With her Bioprinter, the eventual idea is for people to have “food factories” in their homes and digitally print health food supplements on demand.

3-D printing with algae

3-D printing with algae

The Algaerium functions like an ink reservoir containing the microalgae. Different algae strains in a variety of colors can be selected, creating colorful printed patterns, while dialing in personalized health food formulas and supplement creation.

Sawa’s research – within her doctoral program at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design, in London – also includes looking into the technology to print algal-based energy devices.

Read More

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Bioenergy-news.com reports that Volkswagen showcased its algae biogas-powered vehicle at a biogas project based in El Torno Chiclana, a town in south-west Spain. The test...
CBS Miami reports that protesters are demanding answers and action over the toxic mess in Florida — a poisonous algae bloom plaguing four counties now under a state of em...
Natural Icelandic astaxanthin supplier, ArcticFarma, has reached an agreement with a subsidiary of China-based BGG to rename itself in order to avoid market confusion. “B...
Benedict O’Donnell writes in the EU Research and Innovation magazine, Horizon, about research being developed on seaweed as a biological, environmentally friendly, sustai...
The water sample taken from the St. Lucie River near the coastline of Ft. Pierce, Florida was loaded with blue-green algae when it arrived in Ben Spaulding’s lab in Scarb...
Jill Fehrenbacher writes in inhabitat.com that when it comes to design, Mother Nature has a lot to teach us. The field of Biodesign has emerged as an exciting new discipl...
If you’re a fan of the television show “Shark Tank”, you won't want to miss the episode that airs this Friday, November 18th 9:00-10:00 p.m. EST on ABC Television, when C...
Forbes is running an interview with Bren Smith, an Ashoka Fellow and the founder of GreenWave, an organization dedicated to restoring oceans, mitigating climate change an...
Discovering which algae species is best suited to make biofuel is no small task. Researchers have tried to evaluate algae in test tubes, but often find lab results don’t ...
Matt Stultz writes in MakeZine.com about Algix’ unique 3-D printing filament created with a combination of algae and Polylactic Acid (PLA) – a biodegradable thermoplastic...
Marlene Cimons, nexusmedianews.com reports that researchers at the University of California San Diego and Sapphire Energy have successfully grown a genetically engineered...
Memory Maninga reports for Zambia Daily Mail that in Mansa, the capital of the Luapula Province of Zambia, spirulina is being grown in ponds in the communities because of...