[ad#PhycoBiosciences AIM Interview]

Research

Marin Sawa using algae to 3-D print health food

September 10, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Algerium Bioprinter developer Marin Sawa

Algerium Bioprinter developer Marin Sawa

Leah Gonzalez writes in psfk.com about Marin Sawa’s Algaerium Bioprinter, a device that explores the personal, digital printing of nourishment using algae as the base media. Sawa’s project is in the context of creating a future where farming crops like Chlorella, Spirulina, and Haematococcus are building blocks of urban agriculture.

In collaboration with Imperial College London, Sawa is studying inkjet-printing technology ­– suitable for printing with algae. With her Bioprinter, the eventual idea is for people to have “food factories” in their homes and digitally print health food supplements on demand.

3-D printing with algae

3-D printing with algae

The Algaerium functions like an ink reservoir containing the microalgae. Different algae strains in a variety of colors can be selected, creating colorful printed patterns, while dialing in personalized health food formulas and supplement creation.

Sawa’s research – within her doctoral program at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design, in London – also includes looking into the technology to print algal-based energy devices.

Read More

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Cheryl Katz writes in National Geographic that Iceland’s last living lake balls are disappearing. The fluffy green supersize diatoms as large as a head of cabbage are one...
For plants and algae that carry on photosynthesis, light can be too much of a good thing. On a bright, sunny day, a plant might only be able to utilize 20 percent or less...
In one of the most comprehensive studies to date, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers have sequenced the genes of a harmful algal bloom, unveiling nev...
The Energy Department (DOE) has announced the selection of six projects for up to $12.9 million in federal funding, entitled, “Project Definition for Pilot- and Demonstra...
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft reports in Science Daily that two algae species survived 16 months on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) despite extreme temper...
Dan Wood, at the University of Connecticut, writes that assistant extension educator of marine aquaculture at UConn’s Avery Point Campus, Anoushka Concepcion, spoke about...