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Marin Sawa using algae to 3-D print health food

September 10, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Algerium Bioprinter developer Marin Sawa

Algerium Bioprinter developer Marin Sawa

Leah Gonzalez writes in psfk.com about Marin Sawa’s Algaerium Bioprinter, a device that explores the personal, digital printing of nourishment using algae as the base media. Sawa’s project is in the context of creating a future where farming crops like Chlorella, Spirulina, and Haematococcus are building blocks of urban agriculture.

In collaboration with Imperial College London, Sawa is studying inkjet-printing technology ­– suitable for printing with algae. With her Bioprinter, the eventual idea is for people to have “food factories” in their homes and digitally print health food supplements on demand.

3-D printing with algae

3-D printing with algae

The Algaerium functions like an ink reservoir containing the microalgae. Different algae strains in a variety of colors can be selected, creating colorful printed patterns, while dialing in personalized health food formulas and supplement creation.

Sawa’s research – within her doctoral program at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design, in London – also includes looking into the technology to print algal-based energy devices.

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