[ad#The Buzz Sponsor Ad]

Lone Star students get algae pond on campus

July 24, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Erik Patton, a recent graduate of LSC-Montgomery, and Josh Bond, a current student in the college’s biotechnology program, work on the recently donated open pond.

Erik Patton, a recent graduate of LSC-Montgomery, and Josh Bond, a current student in the college’s biotechnology program, work on the recently donated open pond.

YourHoustonNews.com reports that Lone Star College-Montgomery, in the Houston suburb of The Woodlands has received a donation of $27,000 to build an open pond on campus to allow students to grow large amounts of algae that will be used to research novel agricultural techniques for water remediation and agricultural research. The donation was made by David Maniatis, community developer for Aperion, a property development company based in Arizona that donated $82,000 to LSC-Montgomery’s Biotechnology Institute in 2012.

Aperion and LSC-Montgomery’s Biotechnology Institute teamed up early last year to seek biological processes for water treatment and waste remediation for Rio West, a developing community outside of Albuquerque, N.M., that hopes to be the first-ever environmentally, economically and socially sustainable master-planned community in the United States.

LSC-Montgomery students have been working to develop new techniques for desalinization of the community’s 65 million acre-feet of water in an aquifer beneath the site. “This type of pond is a cost-effective way to grow large amounts of algae, expanding our water remediation efforts even further,” said Danny Kainer, director of the college’s Biotechnology Institute. “The four different cells (in the pond) will allow side-by-side comparisons of different experimental conditions and provide even more data to allow us to increase production from the lab scale to the pilot scale.”

Matthew Huber, founder and biological oceanographer of Green Reactions LLC, a sustainable research and development company, will oversee the pond’s construction and installation. “If these students continue to make good choices and use some of these resources, they’ll be the next drivers of this industry,” Huber said.

Aperion’s donation to LSC-Montgomery’s Biotechnology Institute in 2012 allowed for a revamp of the college’s existing greenhouse; made a scanning electron microscope donated by Rice University more usable; and provided a flow cytometer and an automated cell counter, analytical instruments in the industry that aid students in monitoring algal growth patterns.

According to Kainer, the students have maintained their biological remediation research, already characterizing how different types of algae react to the brackish aquifer water. Their next objective is to optimize culture conditions that will enable the aquifer water to be used as a water source to promote large-scale algal growth, aquaponics, and aquaculture.

Read More

More Buzz…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Arizona is taking advantage of its open land and ample sunshine to assume a leadership position in the algae biofuel field. The state is home to two national algae testbe...
MicroBio Engineering, Inc., of San Luis Obispo, California, has introduced a full suite of open pond microalgae growth systems designed for quick deployment of research- ...
Most Americans get plenty of protein, primarily from animal products including meat, eggs and milk. But for many, ensuring a healthy protein intake can be challenging. In...
Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae because of their color, have endured for more than 2.5 billion years, providing ample time to adapt to changes in the Earth'...
Allan Koay writes in thestar.com about a Universiti Malaya research project paving the way for the commercial production of paper pulp and bioethanol from seaweed. The Al...
K. S. Rajgopal writes in thehindu.com about a new study that demonstrates how macroalgal biomass from Gelidiella acerosa and Gracilaria dura collected from Adri and Verav...
UC San Diego’s efforts to produce innovative and sustainable solutions to the world’s environmental problems have resulted in a partnership with the region’s surfing indu...
Algiran, an Iranian algal biotech company, has recently established a pilot scale algal cultivation demonstration facility at the Chabahar Free Zone, in the Baluchistan P...
Hannah Osborne writes in the International Business Times that algae has been genetically engineered to kill cancer cells without harming healthy cells. The algae nanopar...
Ewen Callaway writes in the jounal Nature that restrictions on harvests and exports of Gelidium seaweed in Morocco have affected the global supply of the lab reagent agar...
Jennifer Grebow writes in Nutritional Outlook that astaxanthin supplier AstaReal, of Burlington, NJ, one of the founding members of the Natural Algae Astaxanthin Associat...
Algae may hold the key to feeding the world’s burgeoning population. If algae’s efficiency at taking in carbon dioxide from the air could be transferred to crops, we coul...