Click here for more information about Algenuity
Click here for more information about Liqofluxphenometrics515R1
Visit cricatalyst.com!Evodos Separation Technology

Research

High-performance bioplastics from seaweed

January 8, 2017
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

The researchers extracted fat and fatty acid from dried green algae. Then, an enzyme reaction of the fats created carboxylic acid, a material used to manufacture high-performance plastic. Image: Arirang News

Park Se-young, at Arirang News, writes about a Korean research team at Ewha Womans University, in Seoul, South Korea that has developed the technology to manufacture eco-friendly, high performance, bioplastics using seaweed. This technique is the first of its kind to use lipids from algae, according to the scientists.

To do it, the researchers extracted fat and fatty acid from dried green algae. Then, an enzyme reaction of the fats created carboxylic acid, a material used to manufacture high-performance plastic.

“The existing process requires high temperatures and pressure and uses strong oxidizers,” said Professor Park Jin-byung, of Ewha Womans University, “but we’ve reduced the level of energy consumption and formation of environmental pollutants.”

High-performance plastics are found in cars, airplanes and smartphones, and demand for them is growing. The global market for the material is estimated to grow from around 15 billion U.S. dollars this year to over 35 billion by 2026. On the downside, the material is manufactured at high temperatures using toxic materials, emitting lots of environmental pollutants in the process.

The new production process happens at room temperature and doesn’t require any exceptional pressure conditions, so the new material reduces the number of harmful bi-products emitted during the manufacturing process.

Going forward, the research team plans to develop the technology for mass production of the material and take its invention to the market.

See More

More Like This…

HOME A.I.M. Archives

Copyright ©2010-2018 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

twittertopbarlinks_eventstopbarlinks_requesttopbarlinks_archives

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
If we built a Green Friendship Bridge composed of 8,600 algae microfarms given to Mexican and Central American farmers in lieu of 1%, (13 miles) of additional border wall...
Benedict O’Donnell writes in the EU Research and Innovation magazine, Horizon, about research being developed on seaweed as a biological, environmentally friendly, sustai...
Karen Phillips writes for deeperblue.com that algae are the alveoli in the ocean lungs of our planet, vitally important to the health of the seas as home, food source, sa...
Nicolas Sainte-Foie writes for Labiotech.eu about French startup Algopack manufacturing bio-based plastics made from brown algae. Founded by Rémy Lucas in 2010 and manage...
The University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research’s (CAER) Biofuels and Environmental Catalysis Group has received a $1.2 million U.S. Department of Ener...
For algal biofuels to compete with petroleum, farming algae has to become less expensive. Toward that goal, Sandia National Laboratories is testing strains of algae for r...
Almost two years ago, on June 28, 2015, the rocket carrying experiments from Chatfield High School to the International Space Station disintegrated 139 seconds into its f...
Algatech has announced the opening of Algatech Inc., a New York City-based subsidiary created to serve the North American market. The company has appointed Ken Seguine to...
ExxonMobil and Synthetic Genomics Inc. have announced that, in joint research into advanced biofuels, they have modified an algal strain to more than double its oil conte...
Will Yeates reports in DailyPlanet.com that an urban “algae farm” producing low-carbon protein and bio-fuel is one of the highlights on show this week at the future energ...
Washington State University researchers have developed a biofilm reactor to grow algae more efficiently, and make the algae more viable for several industries, including ...
Adoption of advanced technologies in various stages of natural astaxanthin production, such as microalgae harvesting, cultivation, extraction, and drying, have been major...