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Future of Algae Book Released

July 10, 2012
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Imagine Our Algae FutureImagine Our Algae Future, Visionary Algae Architecture and Landscape Designs, by Robert Henrikson and Mark Edwards, invites us to imagine our future living in cities where buildings are covered with photosynthetic skins and vertical gardens, collecting the sun’s energy and producing food and energy for urban dwellers. Where greening desert coastlines produce food for millions of people, and algae systems recycle polluting wastes into high value animal food, fuel and biofertilizers.

Based on the highly acclaimed authors’ diverse and enthusiastic response from entries to the International Algae Competition – a global challenge to design our future with algae food and energy systems – this book reviews algae production, products and potential today, and premieres some amazing visions of our algae-influenced future, exploring rich and diverse opportunities that will impact nearly every aspect of our lives.

Imagine Our Algae Future chapters:

  1. Introduction
  2. Algae Production, Products & Potential Today
  3. International Algae Competition Awards Exhibits from the International Algae Competition
  4. Algae Production Systems
  5. Visionary Architecture and Landscape Designs
  6. Algae Food Development and Recipes
  7. References and Author Biographies

164 pages * full color * 8″x10″ * ISBN 1475128185 * $29.95   Available at Amazon.com

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