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FIT announces student equipment and travel grant

September 30, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Fluid Imaging TechnologiesScarborough, ME-based laboratory instrumentation manufacturer, Fluid Imaging Technologies (FIT), has announced that it is accepting applications for the first, annual FlowCAM® Student Equipment & Travel Grant for Algae Technology Research. The grant is open to graduate students and senior undergraduate students studying advanced uses of algae for biofuels, nutraceuticals, plastics or other commercial applications at a college or university in North America.

The algae technology research grant provides use of the company’s FlowCAM VS-IV imaging particle analysis system for four months plus on-site training and support throughout the project and the cost of travel to the 2014 ABO Algae Biomass Summit or other appropriate North American industry conference within twelve months of the project. The candidate is expected to deliver an oral presentation at the appropriate conference.

Fluid Imaging Technologies’ algae technology manager, Victoria Kurtz, said, “We’re excited to offer this program. The FlowCAM student grant program underscores Fluid Imaging’s commitment to support the industry and development of algae technologies in the future.”

The grant proposals are due by December 31, 2013, and after evaluation by a select panel of independent industry experts in the algae technology field, the announcement of the award winner will be made on January 15th, 2013.

For details on applying for the grant, call Victoria Kurtz, (207) 289-3200. or email victoria@fluidimaging.com. Fluid Imaging Technologies, Inc.; 200 Enterprise Drive, Scarborough, Maine 04074 www.fluidimaging.com

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