The Buzz

European Partnership to Study Algal Bioenergy

September 7, 2011
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

Anew €14 million ($19.7million USD) initiative is bringing together experts from across North West Europe to develop the potential of algae as a source of sustainable energy. The four and a half year project, called Energetic Algae (EnAlgae), will address the current lack of information on macro- and microalgal productivity in North West Europe.

EnAlgae will establish a series of pilot scale seaweed farms and microalgae growth facilities in the region to provide information needed to assess the productivity of algae cultivation. This information will be used to better understand the economics and greenhouse gas balances of making fuel, energy and other products from algae in North West Europe. Another output will be a computer-based tool to inform decision makers about how and where algae could be grown in the region.

“Algae offers significant potential for the sustainable production of energy and fuels,” says Dr. Claire Smith, algae lead at the NNFCC, the United Kingdom’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials. “Much of the focus so far has been on the production of algae in more favorable climates, such as the US, but there is a distinct lack of information about how algae grow at scale in more challenging climates. The EnAlgae project will allow us to look seriously at the potential of algae for the UK and the NNFCC are delighted to offer our expertise in developing markets for sustainable algal bioenergy production.”

The project’s manager, Dr. Robin Shields, Director of the Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research at Swansea University, said “Algal bioenergy has been identified as a strategic priority by the INTERREG IVB NWE programme. The EnAlgae expert partnership has been formed to develop and implement technologies tailored to the unique socio-economic and environmental conditions of North West Europe.”

EnAlgae is co-funded under the European Regional Development Fund by the North West Europe INTERREG IVB North West Europe programme and the Welsh Government’s Targeted Match Fund, together with a range of co-sponsors.

The EnAlgae partnership is comprised of:

  • Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research (CSAR), UK (Lead Partner)
  • European Biomass Industry Association (BE)
  • Ghent University (BE)
  • Laborelec Ltd (GDF-SUEZ) (BE)
  • Flanders Marine (BE)
  • University College West Flanders (BE)
  • Agency for Renewable Resources (DE)
  • HTW University of Applied Sciences (DE)
  • Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (DE)
  • Centre d’Etude et de Valorisation des Algues (FR)
  • National University of Ireland Dublin, University College Dublin (IE)
  • National University of Ireland, Galway (IE)
  • Wageningen UR (including Plant Research International) / ACRRES (NL)
  • Birmingham City University (UK)
  • InCrops Enterprise Hub (UK)
  • National Non-Food Crops Centre (UK)
  • Plymouth Marine Laboratory (UK)
  • Queen’s University Belfast (UK)
  • The Scottish Association for Marine Science (UK)

For more information: enquiries@nnfcc.co.uk

Go to HOME Page

Copyright ©2010-2011 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

Visit the A.I.M. Archives

AIM interview ArchivesAlgae 101 ArchivesHot Products ArchivesInnovations ArchivesMoney ArchivesProcess ArchivesResearch ArchivesScale Up ArchivesThe Buzz Archives

FREE Algae News & Updates

Sign up to receive breaking A.I.M. updates! 

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
Scientists at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire, have discovered that marine microalgae can completely replace the wild fish oil currently used to feed tilapia...
Prior posts highlight the value proposition for building a Green Friendship Bridge of algae microfarms in lieu of 1%, (13 miles) of Donald Trump’s proposed border wall wi...
Tafline Laylin writes for Inhabitat.com about the elegant solution that Romanian designer Alexandru Predonu has conceived that uses solar energy to power a rotating desal...
Karen Phillips writes for deeperblue.com that algae are the alveoli in the ocean lungs of our planet, vitally important to the health of the seas as home, food source, sa...
Jill Fehrenbacher writes in inhabitat.com that when it comes to design, Mother Nature has a lot to teach us. The field of Biodesign has emerged as an exciting new discipl...
Algatechnologies Ltd (Algatech), of Kibbutz Ketura, Israel, has become part of the FoodConnects consortium, as winner of a pan-European competition for the Food4Future pr...
Discovering which algae species is best suited to make biofuel is no small task. Researchers have tried to evaluate algae in test tubes, but often find lab results don’t ...
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft reports in Science Daily that two algae species survived 16 months on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) despite extreme temper...
Aquaculture is the fastest-growing segment in the feed industry. According to the 2017 Alltech Global Feed Survey, the aquaculture industry experienced a 12 percent incre...
Sarah Karacs reports for @CNNTech that Japanese firm Euglena has been cultivating a type of algae for use in food and cosmetics. But it sees a range of other potential us...
Diane Stopyra writes in Salon.com that a growing number of coastal states around the country are undertaking large-scale seaweed farming projects. While farms are underwa...
Carl Zimmer writes in The New York Times about a team of Australian scientists studying how climate change will alter ecosystems – by using miniature ecosystems, called m...