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EADS launches algae to kerosene project in Germany

July 23, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

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The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company N.V. (EADS) has announced plans to build an algae technical center, to produce biokerosene from algae. One of three projects sharing a €11m ($14.6 million USD) grant from the Bavarian Ministry of Sciences, Research and the Arts, EADS will work with the Technical University of Munich (TUM) to build the facility on the Ludwig Boelkow Innovation Campus, in Ottobrunn/Taufkirchen, near Munich, Germany.

“With the campus, the Free State of Bavaria is investing in the technologies of tomorrow and uniting expertise in aerospace and security in one place. This enables us to establish unparalleled cooperation between industry and research, from which Bavaria also profits,” said Deputy Prime Minister of Bavaria, Martin Zeil.

In the algae-powered flight project “AlgenFlugKraft” the focus of research is on the industrial use of biokerosene, for which microalgae serve as the basis for producing biofuel. EADS will build the new facility In order to investigate the growth of algae under various climatic conditions. EADS and the Bavarian Ministry of Sciences will jointly finance the facility, which is expected to cost approximately €10m ($13.23 million USD),

Jean Botti, Chief Technical Officer of EADS, said, “The Ludwig Boelkow Campus stands for innovation and advanced technology. With EADS Innovation Works headquartered in Ottobrunn, the campus is situated in the perfect environment. The launch of joint research projects is the start of networked research in the fields of aerospace and security.”

The partners in the Ludwig Boelkow Campus consortium are EADS, IABG and Siemens, along with the Technical University of Munich, the Bundeswehr University Munich, the Munich University of Applied Sciences, Bauhaus Luftfahrt, and the German Aerospace Center.

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