[ad#PhycoBiosciences AIM Interview]

Research

DOE awards UA-led team $8M for biofuel

October 3, 2013
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com

The UA’s Algal Raceway Integrated Design, or ARID, system.

The UA’s Algal Raceway Integrated Design, or ARID, system.

The University of Arizona (UA) is the lead institution for the Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed, or RAFT, partnership, which was recently awarded $8 million over four years by the Department of Energy (DOE) to research how algae can be grown year-round outdoors in open ponds in different climates. In addition, other researchers and companies will collaborate with the research team to develop harvesting and conversion processes to produce biofuels and bioproducts.

“Our job is to figure out how we take algae and turn it into biofuels, bioproducts and feed in an economically sustainable way. We want to make a biofuels industry in America,” said University of Arizona’s Kimberly Ogden, chemical and environmental engineering professor, the UA’s primary investigator on the RAFT project.

Texas A&M AgriLife is working with UA to optimize algal growth systems to yield more biomass and lipids, develop methods of recycling and reusing water, and experiment with methodologies for growing various algae strains.

The majority of the research will be done using UA’s Algal Raceway Integrated Design, or ARID, system, which was designed and patented by Ogden’s research partners Randy Ryan, of the Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station, part of the UA College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Pete Waller and Murat Kacira, of the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering; and Perry Li, of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. The research team also includes Judy Brown, a professor in the UA School of Plant Sciences.

“Part of the goal of this grant is to better understand the relationships between flow rate, nutrients, pH, temperature and algal productivity so we can optimize system performance and have an automated system,” said Ogden

“To tackle the problem of large-scale production of algae for fuels and other products, we need to have a better understanding of everything from the biology to the interfacing with existing petroleum processing plants,” Ogden added.

The UA’s contribution to this project focuses on water usage and quality issues, plant biology, reactor design and the production of various algae strains for advanced testing.

More Like This…

HOME Algae Industry Jobs

Copyright ©2010-2013 AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com. All rights reserved. Permission required to reprint this article in its entirety. Must include copyright statement and live hyperlinks. Contact editorial@algaeindustrymagazine.com. A.I.M. accepts unsolicited manuscripts for consideration, and takes no responsibility for the validity of claims made in submitted editorial.

From The A.I.M. Archives

— Refresh Page for More Choices
For plants and algae that carry on photosynthesis, light can be too much of a good thing. On a bright, sunny day, a plant might only be able to utilize 20 percent or less...
If you’re a fan of the television show “Shark Tank”, you won't want to miss the episode that airs this Friday, November 18th 9:00-10:00 p.m. EST on ABC Television, when C...
In one of the most comprehensive studies to date, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers have sequenced the genes of a harmful algal bloom, unveiling nev...
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft reports in Science Daily that two algae species survived 16 months on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) despite extreme temper...
Aquaculture is the fastest-growing segment in the feed industry. According to the 2017 Alltech Global Feed Survey, the aquaculture industry experienced a 12 percent incre...
The University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research’s (CAER) Biofuels and Environmental Catalysis Group has received a $1.2 million U.S. Department of Ener...