Algae and the White Cliffs of Dover

Algae and the White Cliffs of Dover

The White Cliffs of Dover span England’s southeastern coastline for 16 kilometers (10 miles) and reach as tall as 110 meters (350 feet) high. Facing the narrowest part of the English Channel, the cliffs have come to symbolize England since the time of Julius Caesar, often the first and last view travelers have of the country by sea…

Algal enzyme could improve photosynthesis efficiency

Algal enzyme could improve photosynthesis efficiency

For plants and algae that carry on photosynthesis, light can be too much of a good thing. On a bright, sunny day, a plant might only be able to utilize 20 percent or less of absorbed sunlight. The plant dissipates the excess light energy to prevent damage and oxidative stress, and a process called the xanthophyll cycle…

Seaweed’s role in carbon sequestration

Seaweed’s role in carbon sequestration

R&D Magazine reports that researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia have helped to reveal a major role for the abundance of seaweed growing around the world’s coasts. Some years ago, Carlos Duarte, now director of the Red Sea Research Center at KAUST…

Iceland’s lake ball diatoms disappearing

Iceland’s lake ball diatoms disappearing

Cheryl Katz writes in National Geographic that Iceland’s last living lake balls are disappearing. The fluffy green supersize diatoms as large as a head of cabbage are one of the planet’s most unusual plants. This distinctive form of the freshwater alga Aegagropila linnaei is exceedingly rare. Northern Iceland’s Lake Mývatn…

Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis

Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis

Phys.org reports that scientists from the University of Southampton have reengineered the fundamental process of photosynthesis to power useful chemical reactions that could be used to produce biofuels, pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. Photosynthesis in plants and algae consists of two reactions…

Israeli algal research team turns up the hydrogen

Israeli algal research team turns up the hydrogen

Judy Siegel-Itzkovich writes in the Jerusalem Post that Dr. Iftach Yacoby and his research team at Tel Aviv University, in Israel, have genetically altered microalgae to increase its efficiency of producing hydrogen to five times its natural ability. “Hydrogen is an energy source with huge advantages,” says Dr. Yacoby…

Growing seaweed on marine leases

Growing seaweed on marine leases

Sally Dakis reports for Tas Country Hour that salmon farming group Tassal is teaming up with Tasmanian seaweed specialists to trial seaweed farming on fish farm leases. Kai Ho, a company established by seafood purveyor Ashmore Foods Tasmania, and botanist Dr. Craig Sanderson, will trial the farming…

Can seaweeds clean up our mess?

Can seaweeds clean up our mess?

Karen Phillips writes for deeperblue.com that algae are the alveoli in the ocean lungs of our planet, vitally important to the health of the seas as home, food source, sanctuary and above all the source of over half the oxygen on this planet. In coral seas there are two main kinds of flora – the microalgae that live within the coral…

DeuSEL project: “practical” algal-based biofuel by 2018

DeuSEL project: “practical” algal-based biofuel by 2018

In Japan, Isuzu Motors Co. Ltd. and Euglena have joined efforts in the DeuSEL project, aiming at the practical use of microalgal-based biofuel by 2018. The project is divided into two major components, defined by each of the partners. Euglena will be responsible for the R&D for cultivating the euglena microalgae…

Toxic blue-green algae adapting to rising CO2

Toxic blue-green algae adapting to rising CO2

A team of microbiologists at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) are reporting that many toxin-producing algal varieties are even more adept at handling changing climatic conditions than scientists previously thought. This finding is reported in the journal PNAS this week, and has implications for clean drinking water, swimming…

Bentley research fellow planning algae commercialization

Bentley research fellow planning algae commercialization

Thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, Michael Walsh, a research fellow in Bentley University’s Center for Integration of Science and Industry, who holds a doctorate in biological and environmental engineering, is developing a business commercialization plan to use industrially cultivated algae for…

Algal blooms — finding the culprit

Algal blooms — finding the culprit

The water sample taken from the St. Lucie River near the coastline of Ft. Pierce, Florida was loaded with blue-green algae when it arrived in Ben Spaulding’s lab in Scarborough, Maine. As laboratory manager for Fluid Imaging Technologies, Mr. Spaulding ran the thick, green sample through the company’s FlowCam Cyano…

Studying the ALS-algae link

Studying the ALS-algae link

Mike Cote writes in the New Hampshire Union Leader that the link between ALS and cyanobacteria present in algae blooms was first traced to Guam in the 1950s, according to Dr. Elijah Stommel, a professor of neurology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. Stommel is working with Applied GeoSolutions of Newmarket…

Algal “toolkit” discovered to repair proteins

Algal “toolkit” discovered to repair proteins

A new way of fixing inactive proteins has been discovered in an alga, which uses chloroplast extracts and light to release an interrupting sequence from a protein. Research specialist Stephen Campbell and Professor David Stern at the Boyce Thompson Institute, in Ithaca, NY…

CYCLALG algae research consortium targets biodiesel

CYCLALG algae research consortium targets biodiesel

A consortium of six R&D centers in the Basque Autonomous Community, Navarre and France – NEIKER-Tecnalia, National Centre of Renewable Energies, Tecnalia Research & Innovation, Association of Industry of Navarre, Association for the Environment and Safety in Aquitaine, and the Centre for the Application and…

India to join EU research on drugs from cyanobacteria

India to join EU research on drugs from cyanobacteria

S V Krishna Chaitanya writes for newindianexpress that India is set to join an elite European Union (EU) research group aiming at discovering new drug molecules. These include anti-cancerous, antiviral, antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoal molecules, from cyanobacteria (blue green algae) found in marine and…

How bacteria manage algal gardens

How bacteria manage algal gardens

Andy Coghlan reports in New Scientist.com about research that shows how Roseobacter, a type of marine bacteria, tends algae using “pesticides” to keep other microbes away. Understanding how Roseobacter does this could help us better understand nutrient circulation in the world’s oceans, where the bacteria and…

Algae’s dramatic survival gambit

Algae’s dramatic survival gambit

In a recent study, scientists at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have determined the molecular mechanisms which microalgae apply in order to switch from rapid cell division to growth-arrest during times of acute nutrient deficiency…

Hydrogen synthesis from green algae

Hydrogen synthesis from green algae

Science Daily reports that researchers from Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum, one of the largest universities in Germany, have engineered a hydrogen-producing enzyme in the test tube that works as efficiently as the original. The protein — a so-called hydrogenase from green algae — is made up of a protein scaffold and a cofactor…

Harvesting algae as a biofilm

Harvesting algae as a biofilm

In research by Aravindan Rajendran and Bo Hu published recently in Biotechnology for Biofuels, they describe the development of a novel platform technology using algae and fungal cultures. While microalgae is considered a promising source for biofuel and bioenergy production, bio-remediation and production of high-value…

An alga-rithm to save the coral

An alga-rithm to save the coral

Northwestern University researchers have developed a quantitative tool that might help bring back coral from the brink of extinction. The novel algorithm could help assess and predict the future of coral bleaching events by better understanding the coral’s symbiotic partner: algae. “Coral is not an independent organism…

A breakthrough in fish-free aquaculture feed?

A breakthrough in fish-free aquaculture feed?

Scientists at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire, have discovered that marine microalgae can completely replace the wild fish oil currently used to feed tilapia, the second most farmed fish in the world and the most widely farmed in the United States. The findings, which appear in the open-access journal PLOS ONE…

RIT partners with Synergy Biogas on algae project

RIT partners with Synergy Biogas on algae project

Rochester Institute of Technology and Synergy Biogas are exploring the environmental benefits of microalgae to clean agricultural wastewater and make biofuels. Jeff Lodge, associate professor in RIT’s Thomas Gosnell School of Life Sciences, is running the three-month pilot program at Synergy Biogas…

Can seaweed cure food allergies?

Can seaweed cure food allergies?

Edible seaweed are low-calorie and packed with nutrients. Now scientists have found that a type of commercial red macroalgae could help counteract food allergies. They report their findings, using mice, in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (May 17, 2016). Food allergies are a major global health issue that can…

Next Page »