SABANA looks to improve agriculture with microalgae

SABANA looks to improve agriculture with microalgae

The SABANA project, being coordinated by the University of Almeria (UAL), in Spain, is researching biofertilizers and biopesticides as an alternative to the chemicals currently used in agriculture. The focus is on microalgae, which could help improve both the sustainability and profitability of agriculture…

MERCOSUL award to Brazilian student for microalgae DC research

MERCOSUL award to Brazilian student for microalgae DC research

Ângelo Paggi Matos, a doctoral student from Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), in Brasília, Brazil, has been awarded an honorable mention by MERCOSUL Science and Technology Awards — Category: Young…

Genetic early warning for algal blooms

Genetic early warning for algal blooms

In one of the most comprehensive studies to date, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers have sequenced the genes of a harmful algal bloom, unveiling never-before-seen interactions between algae and bacteria that are thought to propagate their growth. The work also opens up the possibility…

Algae foods demonstrate reduced GHGs and water use

Algae foods demonstrate reduced GHGs and water use

Scientists affiliated with the Marine Algal Industrialization Consortium have published a research article demonstrating the potential of using microalgae to significantly mitigate greenhouse gas emissions if used as a source of food. Leading the study was Michael J. Walsh, a research fellow in Bentley University’s Center…

Will algae raise the omega-3 content in farmed salmon?

Will algae raise the omega-3 content in farmed salmon?

Lisa Duchene writes in Global Aquaculture Advocate about a recent study by Stirling University (Scotland) researchers (on the Impact of sustainable feeds on omega-3 long chain fatty acid levels in farmed Atlantic salmon, 2006-2015, Scientific Reports) that revealed that the amount of omega-3 fatty acid in farmed salmon…

Climate change stimulating Arctic algae

Climate change stimulating Arctic algae

Carl Zimmer writes in the New York Times that scientists have reported global warming is altering the ecology of the Arctic Ocean on a huge scale. The annual production of algae, the base of the food web, increased an estimated 47 percent between 1997 and 2015, and the ocean is greening up much earlier each year…

Nannochloropsis’ life at the bottom of the food chain

Nannochloropsis’ life at the bottom of the food chain

Sulogna Mehta reports for the Times of India that scientists from the Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI), in Vizag, the largest city in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, have successfully produced nannochloropsis microalgae concentrate through indoor and outdoor culture, to serve as feed for…

CABC sees future in marine microalgae

CABC sees future in marine microalgae

A group of educators and researchers from Cornell University, the Cornell Algal Biofuel Consortium (CABC), has published a comparative commentary in the December, 2016 issue of Oceanography, the quarterly journal of The Oceanography Society. The commentary sums up a tremendous amount of integrated research…

Green hydrogen, courtesy of algal proteins

Green hydrogen, courtesy of algal proteins

Since hydrogen fuel cells produce electricity, we are increasingly thinking about hydrogen as a successor to crude oil. But where will the hydrogen come from? Its ecologically cleanest source could be from algae bioreactors, partly thanks to an international team of researchers who have for the first time…

Taking ATP3 Workshops on the Road

Taking ATP3 Workshops on the Road

Dr. Tom Dempster works as a research professor – focusing on strain selection and development, biomass production, algal biofuels and high-value products, and air and wastewater bioremediation – at the Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation (AzCATI) at Arizona State University….

Adding algae to feed for bone strength

Adding algae to feed for bone strength

World Poultry reports on testing at animal nutrition company Alltech that compared chicken feed formulas, using algae as a variable, to determine how nutrition, management, and environmental factors can have an impact on bone strength and quality. Leg disorders such as angular bone deformities and…

German microalgae project compares PBR systems

German microalgae project compares PBR systems

Johan U. Grobbelaar has published in the South African Journal of Science his recent research with the AUFWIND project at the Research Centre Jülich in Jülich, Germany. His growth comparison tests consisted of three different commercially available photobioreactor types, constructed adjacent to each other…

Testing algae on “yellow dragon” citrus disease

Testing algae on “yellow dragon” citrus disease

Notimex reports that a group of researchers at the Interdisciplinary Center of Marine Sciences (CICIMAR) of the National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico are researching the applications of algae extracts to combat the “yellow dragon” disease that attacks citrus crops. Scientists conducted an analysis of algae extracts…

Algae and the White Cliffs of Dover

Algae and the White Cliffs of Dover

The White Cliffs of Dover span England’s southeastern coastline for 16 kilometers (10 miles) and reach as tall as 110 meters (350 feet) high. Facing the narrowest part of the English Channel, the cliffs have come to symbolize England since the time of Julius Caesar, often the first and last view travelers have of the country by sea…

Algal enzyme could improve photosynthesis efficiency

Algal enzyme could improve photosynthesis efficiency

For plants and algae that carry on photosynthesis, light can be too much of a good thing. On a bright, sunny day, a plant might only be able to utilize 20 percent or less of absorbed sunlight. The plant dissipates the excess light energy to prevent damage and oxidative stress, and a process called the xanthophyll cycle…

Seaweed’s role in carbon sequestration

Seaweed’s role in carbon sequestration

R&D Magazine reports that researchers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia have helped to reveal a major role for the abundance of seaweed growing around the world’s coasts. Some years ago, Carlos Duarte, now director of the Red Sea Research Center at KAUST…

Iceland’s lake ball diatoms disappearing

Iceland’s lake ball diatoms disappearing

Cheryl Katz writes in National Geographic that Iceland’s last living lake balls are disappearing. The fluffy green supersize diatoms as large as a head of cabbage are one of the planet’s most unusual plants. This distinctive form of the freshwater alga Aegagropila linnaei is exceedingly rare. Northern Iceland’s Lake Mývatn…

Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis

Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis

Phys.org reports that scientists from the University of Southampton have reengineered the fundamental process of photosynthesis to power useful chemical reactions that could be used to produce biofuels, pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. Photosynthesis in plants and algae consists of two reactions…

Israeli algal research team turns up the hydrogen

Israeli algal research team turns up the hydrogen

Judy Siegel-Itzkovich writes in the Jerusalem Post that Dr. Iftach Yacoby and his research team at Tel Aviv University, in Israel, have genetically altered microalgae to increase its efficiency of producing hydrogen to five times its natural ability. “Hydrogen is an energy source with huge advantages,” says Dr. Yacoby…

Growing seaweed on marine leases

Growing seaweed on marine leases

Sally Dakis reports for Tas Country Hour that salmon farming group Tassal is teaming up with Tasmanian seaweed specialists to trial seaweed farming on fish farm leases. Kai Ho, a company established by seafood purveyor Ashmore Foods Tasmania, and botanist Dr. Craig Sanderson, will trial the farming…

Can seaweeds clean up our mess?

Can seaweeds clean up our mess?

Karen Phillips writes for deeperblue.com that algae are the alveoli in the ocean lungs of our planet, vitally important to the health of the seas as home, food source, sanctuary and above all the source of over half the oxygen on this planet. In coral seas there are two main kinds of flora – the microalgae that live within the coral…

DeuSEL project: “practical” algal-based biofuel by 2018

DeuSEL project: “practical” algal-based biofuel by 2018

In Japan, Isuzu Motors Co. Ltd. and Euglena have joined efforts in the DeuSEL project, aiming at the practical use of microalgal-based biofuel by 2018. The project is divided into two major components, defined by each of the partners. Euglena will be responsible for the R&D for cultivating the euglena microalgae…

Toxic blue-green algae adapting to rising CO2

Toxic blue-green algae adapting to rising CO2

A team of microbiologists at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) are reporting that many toxin-producing algal varieties are even more adept at handling changing climatic conditions than scientists previously thought. This finding is reported in the journal PNAS this week, and has implications for clean drinking water, swimming…

Bentley research fellow planning algae commercialization

Bentley research fellow planning algae commercialization

Thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, Michael Walsh, a research fellow in Bentley University’s Center for Integration of Science and Industry, who holds a doctorate in biological and environmental engineering, is developing a business commercialization plan to use industrially cultivated algae for…

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