Predicting and controlling HABs with new device

Predicting and controlling HABs with new device

UCLA researchers have developed an inexpensive and portable device that can analyze water samples immediately, which would provide marine biologists with real-time insight about the possibility that algal blooms could occur in the area they’re testing. That, in turn, would allow officials…

How Algae Becomes Toxic

How Algae Becomes Toxic

A team led by scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) has uncovered the genetic basis for the production of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by harmful algal blooms…

Cutting the Methane

Cutting the Methane

Seaweed may be the super food dairy cattle need to reduce the amount of methane they burp into the atmosphere. Early results from research at the University of California, Davis, indicate that just a touch of the ocean algae in cattle feed could dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions from California’s 1.8 million dairy cows…

Corals and algae go back to Jurassic Period

Corals and algae go back to Jurassic Period

Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought, according to new research led by scientists at Oregon State University and Penn State. The findings, published in Current Biology, are a key advance toward a better understanding…

NMSU researchers mining energy from wastewater

NMSU researchers mining energy from wastewater

Tiffany Acosta writes for the (Las Cruces, NM) Sun-News that three years ago Catherine Brewer was asked to join a university collaboration on bioalgal energy. The assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at New Mexico State University, who specializes in biomass processing, accepted the…

Fossilized algae hold promise for improved food safety

Fossilized algae hold promise for improved food safety

Researchers have used fossilized algae to take a key step toward being able to more sensitively detect harmful contaminants in food. The findings are important because each year 48 million people get sick from tainted food, 128,000 end up in the hospital, and 3,000 die, according to the Centers for Disease Control…

Workshop: Apogee’s French cultivation method for spirulina

Workshop: Apogee’s French cultivation method for spirulina

Apogee Spirulina, in association with Santa Fe Community College will be offering a four-day workshop on the French cultivation method for spirulina. The comprehensive, one-of-its-kind, course will include three days of hands-on Artisan Spirulina farming. The Spirulina portion of the course will be taught…

Reducing the number of annual algal blooms

Reducing the number of annual algal blooms

The massive annual algal blooms around the world, caused by excess fertilizer from farms and cities running off into water supplies, are having severe human health and economic consequences, with economic damages from the issue costing up to $2.3 trillion annually. New research led by Brigham Young University ecosystem…

ASU scientists improving algal hydrogen production

ASU scientists improving algal hydrogen production

Changing the way the nation generates and consumes energy is at the heart of a new NSF grant awarded to Arizona State University and Kevin Redding, professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and director of the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis (CB&P). The goal of Dr. Redding and his research group is to…

UCSD may launch a flip flop revolution

UCSD may launch a flip flop revolution

UC San Diego students and researchers have produced the world’s first algae-based, renewable flip flops. The first prototypes of their new invention, developed over the summer in a York Hall chemistry laboratory, consist of a flexible, spongy slipper adorned with a Triton logo and a simple strap — fairly basic, as flip flops go…

Algae compound testing well as cancer fighter

Algae compound testing well as cancer fighter

Coibamide A, a compound produced by a unique community of blue-green algae, has potent anti-cancer activity in mice and cell cultures that model brain tumors and triple negative breast cancer, two of the most aggressive and difficult-to-treat types of cancer, according to a new study…

Marine bacteria boost growth of diatoms

Marine bacteria boost growth of diatoms

University of Washington oceanographers have found that diatoms — the intricately patterned single-celled algae that exist throughout the world’s oceans — grow faster in the presence of bacteria that release a growth hormone known to benefit land plants. The study, published online May 27 in Nature, uses genetic and…

Understanding dinoflagellate bioluminescence

Understanding dinoflagellate bioluminescence

Algae “red tide” events often create dazzling nighttime light shows of blue-green bioluminescence resulting from the force generated by breaking waves. While many mysteries remain on how such red tide blooms emerge, marine biologists are now making progress in decoding the mechanisms that trigger bioluminescence…

The algae-based sustainable surfboard

The algae-based sustainable surfboard

UC San Diego’s efforts to produce innovative and sustainable solutions to the world’s environmental problems have resulted in a partnership with the region’s surfing industry to create the world’s first algae-based, sustainable surfboard. The surfboard was publicly unveiled and presented to San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer…

Advancing from lab to industrial algae production

Advancing from lab to industrial algae production

Computer Science and Engineering Professor at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) Vineet Bafna was on the roster of experts who spoke at Green Revolution 2.0. The symposium, March 12-13 in the Qualcomm Institute, was organized by the California Center for Algal Biology and the Center for Food…

Algal malaria vaccine advances

Algal malaria vaccine advances

Using a malaria parasite protein produced from algae, paired with an immune-boosting cocktail suitable for use in humans, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine generated antibodies in mice that nearly eliminated mosquito infection by the malaria parasite. The method, published Feb. 17…

Producing two biofuels from Isochrysis algae

Producing two biofuels from Isochrysis algae

Researchers Greg O’Neil of Western Washington University and Chris Reddy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), have exploited an unusual and untapped class of chemical compounds in the microalgae Isochrysis to synthesize both biodiesel and jet fuel, in parallel. The new study was…

OSU researchers combine diatoms and nanoparticles

OSU researchers combine diatoms and nanoparticles

Oregon State University researchers are combining diatoms, a type of single-celled photosynthetic algae, with nanoparticles to create a sensor capable of detecting miniscule amounts of protein…

USU tests algae simulation around the world

USU tests algae simulation around the world

Biplab Das writes in NatureAsia that researchers from Utah State University (USU) have developed a model that simulates algae growth and their lipid productivity at various global locations using…

Algae 101: Part 75

Algae 101: Part 75

A series of articles by Stephen Mayfield and the UCSD Laboratory deserve recognition for their articles on algae-based medicines for malaria and cancer. Mayfield and his team have worked for seven years to create complex protein-based drugs….

From waste to algal biofuel at Cal Poly

From waste to algal biofuel at Cal Poly

Sourceable.net writes about the work Tryg Lundquist is doing at California State Polytechnic University (Cal Poly), employing algae to treat human waste and then converting the biomass into energy…

Arizona students unite for algae research

Arizona students unite for algae research

Students and researchers from the three major public universities across Arizona have joined forces to maximize the use of one of Arizona’s natural resources: algae…

The quest for an edible, multipurpose, malarial vaccine

The quest for an edible, multipurpose, malarial vaccine

Can scientists rid malaria from the Third World by simply feeding algae genetically engineered with a vaccine? That’s the question biologists at UC San Diego sought to answer…

UCSD biologists engineer multi-colored algae

UCSD biologists engineer multi-colored algae

Biologists at UC San Diego have announced the successful engineering of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a green alga commonly used in laboratories, into a rainbow of different colors…

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