New biofuel cell system uses spirulina

New biofuel cell system uses spirulina

Japan for Sustainability reports that Osaka City University announced on April 25, 2018, that it succeeded in developing a new biofuel cell system with the functions of a solar cell and the ability of carbon dioxide conversion. Utilizing the photosynthesis function of spirulina, this solar-light driven biofuel cell…

DTU researches lighting cities with algae

DTU researches lighting cities with algae

At the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Science Nordic.com reports, researchers are investigating bioluminescent algae, to determine whether bioluminescent organisms could one day light up our cities in a turquoise blue light. There are some clear challenges to solve. The researchers say that they may…

James Cook University and MBD biorefine Ulva

James Cook University and MBD biorefine Ulva

A team of researchers at James Cook University has just published a cascading “biorefinery” approach for the extraction of soluble sulphated polysaccharides — known as ulvans — from the green sea lettuce, Ulva. The technique is simple and robust with a view to commercial production for nutraceutical applications…

Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis

Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis

Phys.org reports that scientists from the University of Southampton have reengineered the fundamental process of photosynthesis to power useful chemical reactions that could be used to produce biofuels, pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. Photosynthesis in plants and algae consists of two reactions…

Israeli algal research team turns up the hydrogen

Israeli algal research team turns up the hydrogen

Judy Siegel-Itzkovich writes in the Jerusalem Post that Dr. Iftach Yacoby and his research team at Tel Aviv University, in Israel, have genetically altered microalgae to increase its efficiency of producing hydrogen to five times its natural ability. “Hydrogen is an energy source with huge advantages,” says Dr. Yacoby…

“Porous Substrate Bioreactor” developed at U. of Cologne

“Porous Substrate Bioreactor” developed at U. of Cologne

Gaynor Selby writes in foodingredientsfirst.com that a team of scientists and researchers at the University of Cologne believe they have made a breakthrough that could lead to cultivating algae on a commercial scale in a much cheaper way than is currently possible. Head of botany and algae specialist professor…

Native Alberta algae to detox tailings ponds

Native Alberta algae to detox tailings ponds

Erin Guiltenane reports that a research project underway at the University of Calgary, in Alberta, Canada, aims to clean up oil sands tailings ponds by using native algae already found in them to do the job. Oil sands mining produces pools of wastewater that are difficult…

Developing algae to target wastewater contaminants

Developing algae to target wastewater contaminants

Sean Myers reports that University of Calgary researchers have found a way to program algae with bacterial genes to target unwanted chemicals and pharmaceuticals that end up in wastewater. Lee Jackson, scientific director of the Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets (ACWA) research facility…

UT professor using “tiny greenhouses” to research algae

UT professor using “tiny greenhouses” to research algae

Professor David Sinton of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering has been awarded a 2015 E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). The award will support Sinton’s research into optimizing the growth…

New spirulina and cancer study

New spirulina and cancer study

Alex Strauss writes in Surviving Mesothelioma about a new study on spirulina’s effects on five major types of cancer. Spirulina — a cyanobacterium, or blue-green algae, that is cultivated as a dietary supplement and as a whole food — is rich in plant proteins and contains other vitamins and minerals…

Cyanobacteria efficient at “harvesting” light

Cyanobacteria efficient at “harvesting” light

Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have an ingenious system to prepare themselves for the coming daylight when it is dark by setting up a large “antenna.” This antenna helps them capture light energy in an efficient way, while also providing protection against damage to the photosynthesis mechanism of the…

Coal dust + algae = Coalgae

Coal dust + algae = Coalgae

Heather Dugmore writes for BDlive that a new fuel, Coalgae – produced from a combination of waste coal dust and algae – could save South Africa up to 40% of its crude oil imports. Professor Ben Zeelie and his team at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) combined coal dust with algae to form…

Magnetic nanoparticle harvests microalgae

Magnetic nanoparticle harvests microalgae

Chen Wei-han of the Taipei Times reports that a National Taiwan University (NTU) research team has announced the formulation of a synthetic nanoparticle that is able to extract oil from algae and turn it into biodiesel. The team, led by NTU chemistry professor Chia-wen Wu, synthesized a magnetic nanoparticle for…

A new “fingerprinting” identification tool for algae

A new “fingerprinting” identification tool for algae

Scientists at Newcastle University and the Scottish Association for Marine Science have developed a new identification tool for algae, which could have a major impact on how algae are categorized in the future. In the same way that people can be recognized by their fingerprints, the algae’s proteome is now being used as…

Treating pig waste with algae

Treating pig waste with algae

Murdoch University researchers are investigating whether the effluent from piggeries can be effectively treated with micro- and macroalgae so that species of the organism can be safely fed back to pigs. The Cooperative Research Centre for High Integrity Australian Pork (Pork CRC) has invested $300,000 with the…

Exploring red algae for economic benefits

Exploring red algae for economic benefits

James Konstantin Galvez writes in the Manila Times that red algae, or lumut, which many people there consider insignificant, offers huge economic benefits as a source of food and components for industrial products, according to a new study by the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UPMSI)…

3D printing with algae

3D printing with algae

In an article in the latest issue of Engineering in Life Sciences, Lisa-Marie Rauschendorfer writes about a rarely discussed application of microalgae. As they are sensitive to a range of contaminants, they also can be used as biosensors. The harvesting of cells for such applications from suspensions traditionally…

Red algae fermentation for ethanol

Red algae fermentation for ethanol

Business Korea reports that a Korean research team headed by Choi In-gul, a professor at the Department of Biotechnology at Korea University, has successfully defined the fermentation process of red algae and found a clue to making ethanol…

Lipid accumulation advancement in Japan

Lipid accumulation advancement in Japan

Two scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology have enhanced the lipid accumulation function in nutrient-starved algae, maintaining the cell growth through photosynthesis. Masako Iwai, Core Research for…

Algae Energy Farm developing cattle feed

Algae Energy Farm developing cattle feed

The University of Queensland has established an Algae Energy Farm to cultivate and harvest microalgae for a range of uses, including as a feed supplement for beef cattle. Established by UQ’s School…

Algae as chemical raw materials

Algae as chemical raw materials

Chemists and biologists at Germany’s University of Konstanz have succeeded in transforming algae oil into high-quality chemical raw materials via isomerizing alkoxycarbonylation. This provides the foundation for the use…

NSW looks toward aquatic cultivation

NSW looks toward aquatic cultivation

Jamie Radford writes in the Illawarra Mercury that Pia Winberg, from the University of Wollongong, believes that the South Coast of New South Wales, Australia (NSW) is in an ideal position to become a world leader in aquatic…

Algae can switch quantum coherence on and off

Algae can switch quantum coherence on and off

A University of New South Wales (UNSW)-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during…

Using diatoms to protect grain exports

Using diatoms to protect grain exports

University of Adelaide researchers are using nanotechnology and the fossils of diatoms to develop a novel chemical-free and resistance-free way of protecting stored grain from insects…

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